Why does a Ubuntu guest in VirtualBox run very, very slowly?

1

Ubuntu 12.10 no longer includes Unity 2D, which was implemented for platforms that can’t provide 3D acceleration. Instead, Ubuntu 12.10 has Unity run under LLVM, making code intended for the GPU run on the CPU. It is much slower than using the GPU.

To check if your Ubuntu 12.10 guest is using 3D acceleration, run this command:

$ /usr/lib/nux/unity_support_test -p Not software rendered: no Not blacklisted: yes GLX fbconfig: yes GLX texture from pixmap: yes GL npot or rect textures: yes GL vertex program: yes GL fragment program: yes GL vertex buffer object: yes GL framebuffer object: yes GL version is 1.4+: yes Unity 3D supported: no

As you can see, “Not software rendered” and “Unity 3D supported” both return “no” in this example, which means Unity is using slow LLVMpipe.

How to enable 3D acceleration (VirtualBox 4.2.x only)

These instructions are intended for VirtualBox 4.2.4 or 4.2.6, installed from VirtualBox’s...

0 0
2

If you want to try Linux or Windows 10 on your PC, but you do not want to replace the current operating system, it can be installed into a VirtualBox virtual machine.

This application (available for Windows, Mac and Linux) is a bit like an emulator or simulator for a retro computer, and it runs the operating system in a window on the desktop like a regular application.

If you have not yet discovered VirtualBox, you should try it. You can run old operating systems, so if you have a program that only works in Windows XP, you can install XP in a virtual machine and run it. You can even make the window full screen so it looks like you are really running the guest operating system.

Related: The one BIOS tweak you need to boost VirtualBox speed

A moderately powerful processor is required, but it does not need to be the top of the range. The main requirement is for lots of memory and it is a struggle with just 4GB of RAM, but it can be done. It is best if you...

0 0
3
michaln wrote:

Rootman: Unfortunately, as problem report this is, to use your terminology, unusable. "It ran so slow it was unusable" maybe means something to you but not to anyone else. Is it a specific application/action? Or to put it differently, how do I tell my Windows 10 is "unusable"? It looks quite usable here, but maybe I have different expectations or am not doing the same things.

And as always, where's your VBox.log from the affected VM(s)? Without that, no one can say anything concrete.

I won't post the logs as I don't intend on recreating a Windows 10 guest any time soon. As far as being "concrete", I suppose not, that's why I prefaced my previous comments with "This is just my $0.02 so take it or leave it as you will."

"Unusable" means to me so aggravatingly slow that it cannot be used for any common activity. Simple stuff like opening IE would take 30 to 60 seconds. Once open I was simply cruising the internet and the lag and slowness was so bad...

0 0
4

Ubuntu or other Linux distributions may be slow when you run it within VirtualBox. Often, the cause is that not enough RAM is assigned to the virtual machine, which makes it run slow and makes it unresponsive. However, if your VM already has plenty of RAM and you also already tried assigning an extra virtual CPU core to the machine, this guide might help you make Ubuntu faster in Oracle VM VirtualBox.

Execute the following command to see if 3D acceleration is being used or not:

/usr/lib/nux/unity_support_test -p

It will probably say:

Unity 3D supported: no

Now that’s bad news, because the graphical interface of Ubuntu makes your whole system slow and laggy. So first of all, make sure you have the VirtualBox Guest additions installed.
Once this is installed, we now install the vboxvideo driver:

sudo bash -c 'echo vboxvideo >> /etc/modules'

Now, shutdown Ubuntu. Then, you open the settings of your virtual Ubuntu and you go to ‘Display‘. Now tick...

0 0
5

If you want to experiment with Linux without dual booting and potentially impacting your main operating system, the best way to do so is with virtualization. Virtualization allows you to run Linux directly atop your primary OS, whether it’s Mac OS X or Windows, in a separate virtual machine, with practically no potential for error. It’s completely free and fairly easy to set up, we’ll walk you through the entire process.

Requirements for Running Ubuntu in VirtualBox

Be sure to meet the above requirements before beginning. Once VirtualBox is installed and the Ubuntu ISO is downloaded, you can proceed with set up and installation.

Installing Ubuntu Linux in VirtualBox

Launch VirtualBox and create a new virtual machine, name it something like “Ubuntu Linux” and set the Operating System to “Linux” and version to “Ubuntu” and set the base memory to at least 512MB or 1GB

Create a new virtual hard disk and check “Start-up Disk”, click Continue...
0 0
6

Hi Galleon and Matt,

Just my personal view point about non LTS release of Ubuntu:

I've tried the 12.10, both in 32 bits and 64 bits releases and they're terrible "dogs".

And the next 13.04 due this month is nothing but a "joke" even if still in final beta. Just to make you laugh, yesterday I updated the 13.04 with security fixes proposed by the Update Manager and after the required reboot, I lost my desktop! Oops. Just obliged to reinstall from scratch!

Both 12.10 and rairing (13.04) have a huge need of hardware recourses and run very slowly on old machines (e.g. AMD Athlon XP 32 bits or AMD Sempron 64 bits mono core, but also on Intel core 2 duo 64 bits).

Further, Canonical has decided to reduce the support time to only 9 months for all intermediate versions but the current 12.10 that will be updated during 24 months.

So, I don't really use any of these intermediate releases... but for fun.

The current 12.04...

0 0
7

Last night at an installFest, I helped someone with a Core i7, 6GB of RAM and 300GB free install Ubuntu 12.04 with Unity into a virtual machine. After the install, it was painfully slow. That is an understatement. Every character that I typed didn’t get displayed until about 30 seconds later. To the other person, it seemed that Ubuntu had locked up. He wanted to delete the Ubuntu install and leave. Clearly, something was broken. This was with 12.04.1 32-bit desktop inside the latest available VirtualBox on MS-Windows7 x64..

If I hadn’t seen this myself, I wouldn’t believe it either. Complete instructions follow to speed up VirtualBox for Ubuntu 12.04.1. It should work for prior versions and other Linux-based VMs too.

More and more people are running non-LTS Ubuntu systems. This is sad, since 95% of the Ubuntu people have no business using an OS with 6-9 months of support, but whatever. The tips below will prevent Ubuntu Unity 3D from running. That is by design. Inside...

0 0
8

Ubuntu 12.10 no longer includes Unity 2D, which was implemented for platforms that can't provide 3D acceleration. Instead, Ubuntu 12.10 has Unity run under LLVM, making code intended for the GPU run on the CPU. It is much slower than using the GPU.

To check if your Ubuntu 12.10 guest is using 3D acceleration, run this command:

$ /usr/lib/nux/unity_support_test -p Not software rendered: no Not blacklisted: yes GLX fbconfig: yes GLX texture from pixmap: yes GL npot or rect textures: yes GL vertex program: yes GL fragment program: yes GL vertex buffer object: yes GL framebuffer object: yes GL version is 1.4+: yes Unity 3D supported: no

As you can see, "Not software rendered" and "Unity 3D supported" both return "no" in this example, which means Unity is using slow LLVMpipe.

How to enable 3D acceleration (VirtualBox 4.2.x only)

These instructions are intended for VirtualBox 4.2.4 or 4.2.6, installed from VirtualBox's website, not...

0 0
9
...
0 0
10

We have no idea why Windows in your case can not handle the dynamically allocated virtual disk. It may be worth to check the filesystem integrity or perform a defragmentation from your Windows guest OS.

Nevertheless we can easily increase the size of a dynamically growing virtual drive reported to the guest OS by issueing the following command run in a terminal:

VBoxManage modifyhd --resize

Replace with the uuid or the filename (full path needed) of your virtual drive. These can be listed with the following command:

VBoxManage list hdds

Note that obviously we can not change the virtual drive size if we had taken snapshots or saved the machine's state instead of power off. Before we change the virtual drive's size we therefore need to delete all snapshots, or work on a clone to makes sure we do not loose a snapshot's content. Shrinking a dynamically growing disk is not possible.

After having resized the virtual drive we will then have to adapt the...

0 0
11

Still haven't been able to get this working as a normal user. Looks like all of my devices have the correct permissions:

# ls -lah /dev/vboxdrv crw-rw---- 1 root vboxusers 10, 59 Sep 23 21:37 /dev/vboxdrv # groups shazow disk wheel audio cdrom video usb users cron plugdev speech games qemu scanner vboxusers vmware shazow

Unfortunately my /dev/usbdev* devices are owned by root:root by default, so I had to add a udev rule:

# cat /etc/udev/rules.d/10-local.rules SUBSYSTEMS=="usb", ATTRS{product}=="iPhone", NAME="%k", SYMLINK="iphone", GROUP="usb" # ls -lah /dev/usbdev* crw-rw---- 1 root plugdev 189, 9 Sep 24 21:24 /dev/usbdev1.10 crw-rw---- 1 root usb 254, 30 Sep 24 21:24 /dev/usbdev1.10_ep00 crw-rw---- 1 root usb 254, 27 Sep 24 21:25 /dev/usbdev1.10_ep02 crw-rw---- 1 root usb 254, 31 Sep 24 21:25 /dev/usbdev1.10_ep04 crw-rw---- 1 root usb 254, 28 Sep 24 21:25 /dev/usbdev1.10_ep81 crw-rw---- 1 root usb 254, 29 Sep 24 21:25 /dev/usbdev1.10_ep83 crw-rw---- 1 root...
0 0
12

Why is it that the U.S. Government always releases a slew of RFPs just before Thanksgiving? I’ve been swamped working on proposals since the third week of November, but we got the last one submitted just before Christmas so it’s back to normal (or what passes for normal around here) for a while.

I thought I’d take this relatively quiet period to do a quickie comparison between a couple of virtualization tools: QEMU and Oracle's VirtualBox. For the comparison I chose to install virtual guest instances of Ubuntu 10.10 desktop from a downloaded copy of the iso. The host system is an AMD 64-bit machine that is also running Ubuntu 10.10 desktop. Here’s the kernel version of the host at the time of this writing: 2.6.35-24-generic #42-Ubuntu SMP Thu Dec 2 02:41:37 UTC 2010 x86_64 GNU/Linux. I used VirtualBox 4.0 for this comparison.

Both products provide a graphical interface for building a new virtual guest instance. Here are what a few of the QEMU build sequence steps...

0 0
13

This page contains download links for a very old Microsoft operating system so that it can be preserved -- on this corner of the Internet, anyway -- for anyone who is curious to tinker with the first versions of Windows or who just wants to take a trip down Nostalgia Avenue.

The operating systems here are distributed as floppy disk image files (with an .img extension). If you actually have a floppy drive, you'll have to flash these images onto floppy disks. If you just want to use VirtualBox, it can make use of the floppy image files directly.

MS-DOS 6.22

The last version of MS-DOS from the Windows 3.1 era, before Windows 95.

¤ Download (.zip, 3.5 MB)

Windows for Workgroups 3.11

The first version of Windows to support TCP/IP networking.

Disk images (*.img files) for use with VirtualBox or flashing to floppy disks:

¤ Download (.zip, 10.3 MB)

Unpacked disk images (ZIP file containing all files from...

0 0