Where are the Unity Launcher .desktop files?

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Unity Launchers are actually files stored in your computer, with a '.desktop' extension. In earlier Ubuntu versions, these files were simply used so as to launch a specific application, but in Unity they are also used so as to create right-click menus for each application, which you can access from the Unity Launcher.

This article describes how to create a working .desktop file for general use, but also how to add it to the Unity Launcher and/or how to edit a Unity Launcher itself, by editing its fields or by adding a right-click menu to it.

There are currently 2 ways of creating a desktop file. The 1st one is using a text editor, like Gedit, and the 2nd one is installing a program (gnome-panel) or using 'alacarte' that both do the job for you. The former lets you "control" your launcher more than the latter, but the latter way is easier. Please note that this section will cover only the basics, not how to add shortcuts to your launcher. For this, please head to...

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I recently asked this question as I could not google the documentation for how .desktop files should look like. Does such documentation exist? Where is it?

The file format is specified in the Freedesktop.org Desktop Entry Specification

There is a good wiki about Unity Launchers and Desktop Files in the Ubuntu documentation. Click here for more info.

This is what a general .desktop file looks like -

[Desktop Entry] Version=1.0 Name=ProgramName Comment=This is my comment Exec=/home/dennyac/executable.sh Icon=/home/dennyac/icon.png Terminal=false Type=Application Categories=Utility;Application;

Version - Version of the .desktop file.

Name - Name of the Application.

Comment - Comment that describes the program.

Exec - Path to the executable file.

Icon - Path to the icon (Generally a png or xpm file).

Terminal - Either true or false (Determines whether application should run in a terminal.

Type - Type of the launcher...

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How can I set up PyCharm to launch from the Launcher?

I have installed PyCharm on my brand new Ubuntu 13.10 laptop.

To launch PyCharm, I find I must navigate to the directory that pycharm lives in, and execute it from there as such:

cd home/matt/software/pycharm/bin sh pycharm.sh

I hope this isn't asking too much, but I would like to be able to click on an icon in the Launcher to launch this application.

I tried right-clicking on the PyCharm icon in the Launcher when the app is running and selecting "Lock To Launcher" but this doesn't work (after pinning, when I try to run the software this way, the icon throbs in a very awkward manner a few times and does nothing).

A small app called Alacart was rumoured to be useful, but I have no idea how it works, and it appears useless. I'm not sure why the authors teased us with a "Help" button if there are no help files written for us to view.

Further attempt has included reading page after page of...

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Unity Launchers are actually files stored in your computer, with a ‘.desktop’ extension. In earlier Ubuntu versions, these files were simply used so as to launch a specific application, but in Unity they are also used so as to create right-click menus for each application, which you can access from the Unity Launcher.

This article describes how to create a working .desktop file for general use, but also how to add it to the Unity Launcher and/or how to edit a Unity Launcher itself, by editing its fields or by adding a right-click menu to it.

There are currently 2 ways of creating a desktop file. The 1st one is using a text editor, like Gedit, and the 2nd one is installing a program (gnome-panel) or using ‘alacarte’ that both do the job for you. The former lets you “control” your launcher more than the latter, but the latter way is easier. Please note that this section will cover only the basics, not how to add shortcuts to your launcher. For this, please head to...

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Ubuntu's Unity desktop environment has divided the opinion of many Linux users over the past few years but it has matured very well and once you get used to it you will see that actually it is very easy to use and highly intuitive.

In this article, I will show you how to use the launcher icons within Unity.

The launcher sits on the left-hand side of the screen and cannot be moved. There are however certain tweaks that you can make to resize the icons and to hide the launcher when it isn't in use and I will show you how to do this later on in the article.

The Icons

Ubuntu comes with a standard set of icons attached to the launcher. From top to bottom the functions of these icons are as follows:

Open the dashFilesFirefoxLibreOffice WriterLibreOffice CalcLibreOffice ImpressUbuntu Software ToolAmazonSystem SettingsTrash

Left clicking opens the individual function for the icons.

The top option opens the Unity Dash which provides a...

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Ubuntu 11.04 Natty Narwhal replaces the familiar Windows-like Gnome desktop environment with the Unity desktop environment. Personally, I found the switch rather jarring at first. I think I may have even been angry. But after spending some time with Unity, I think I’m starting to get it–especially since I run Ubuntu on a netbook, which is Unity’s forte.

Anyway, I was most devastated when I lost my precious panel launchers. Similar to the Windows Quick Launch Bar, Gnome let you launch frequently used applications and documents from convenient icons along the top panel.With Unity, there is no such thing. Rather, all graphical shortcuts are confined to the vertical launcher bar, which runs the height of the left-hand side of the screen and auto-hides.

While the Gnome panel was comparable to the Windows taskbar, the Unity launcher is more like the OS X dock. Application icons pop up here when they are running, and you can choose to keep your favorites there permanently...

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The recent upgrade to Ubuntu 12.04 Precise Pangolin left me somewhat hanging when it comes to creating launchers on the desktop, and also in the Unity Launcher (also called quicklaunch in some places) for Zend Studio and PHPStorm. In Gnome prior to Unity in Ubuntu it was easy to right click the desktop and select Create Launcher to create icons on the desktop to launch applications or scripts, but in 12.04 that options is gone. So here is how I solved some of the issues.

I will cover adding Eclipse to the launcher, adding Zend Studio to the launcher, and PHPStorm to the launcher.

Method 1 (easiest)

For Netbeans and Eclipse based editors like Zend Studio or Aptana it is not too bad. I created a {name}.desktop files for each one and put it in the /home/{username}/.local/share/applications/ directory. Here is how I created a zendstudio.desktop file:

Note: If you want this option to be available for all users you can alternatively create the file in the...

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First of all, I made this tutorial for noobs, just like me. Don't fear all these command lines, you will just copy and paste most of them and little will have to be typed. All of this I found out googling. If you want further explanation on some topic, you can do the same. ;) What more can I say? Sorry for any mispelling, english is not my mother language. Good luck!


1) Executable

Probably you have already downloaded a Soulseek client. At time of this writing, I'm using "SoulseekQt-2014-5-4" build, as the last ("SoulseekQt-2013-11-6") version did not worked for me.

Nir (Soulseek creator) said that a new build would come out to Downloads page soon. But until then, you can download that version from this post of him.

Anyway, make sure you have the last build and extract the executable from tgz file to a new directory "Soulseek" in your home (or anywhere you like). My executable is like this:

~/Soulseek/SoulseekQt-2014-5-4
...

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A Tool to make it easy to open different Unity projects with the corresponding Unity version.

Screenshot

Install

Usage

Start it to show a menu window near your mouse cursor with a list of your Unity versions and projectsClicking on a button will open the corresponding Unity version or project using the fitting Unity version ESC closes the popup window

Command line arguments

If you don't want to use the unity-launcher.txt config on your desktop you can the absolute path to another file as the first argument.e.g. unity-launcher.exe c:\projects\my-unity-launcher.cfg

Config

The config file consists of 2 parts splitted by --- Empty lines and lines starting with # gets ignored First part (Unity versions) above the ---Alternating lines between Version string and path to Unity.exe The versions get matched by prefixonly use the version numbers or a prefix of them no unity 5.5 or similar 5.5 matches 5.5.1p4, 5.5.0l1 5.5.1 matches 5.5.1p4...
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The introduction of Unity as the default desktop environment on Ubuntu 11.04 marks a radical shift from the classic GNOME 2.0 desktop shell of previous Ubuntu versions.

Whilst Unity is not entirely uncontroversial, and the classic Ubuntu GNOME desktop remains an option for those preferring not to switch, it is clear that Unity is here to stay and will be the main focus of desktop evolution in future versions of Ubuntu. The goal of this chapter, therefore, is to provide an overview and guided tour of Unity.

Those familiar with the older GNOME 2.0 environment or other more traditional desktop environments may find Unity a little unusual to begin with. After some time using Unity, however, most users will begin to appreciate the clean and simpler interface experience that Unity brings to Ubuntu.

This chapter covers the Unity desktop with the default settings of a newly installed Ubuntu system. The configuration and customization of Unity is covered in detail...

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Advertisement

Ubuntu is the most well-known version of Linux around. It’s how millions of people have discovered Linux for the first time, and continues to draw new users into the world of open source operating systems. So the interface Ubuntu uses is one many people are going to see.

In this area, Ubuntu is unique. Even as a new user, rarely will you confuse the default Ubuntu desktop for something else. That’s because Ubuntu has its own interface that you can — but probably won’t — find anywhere else. It’s called Unity.

Unity Is a Desktop Environment

A desktop environment is what you see on your screen. It’s the panel that displays information, enables you to launch apps, and lets you switch from one window to another.

Unity is one of many desktop environments It's Your Choice: The Top 10 Linux Desktop Environments available for free and open source desktops like Linux. This can seem strange if...

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GNOME desktop components:

GNOME core components include:

Control Center: This collection of applications customizes the GNOME environment. gnome-panel : This application provides the tool bar and menu system to launch applications and host panel applets. Panel also interfaces with session manager (gnome-session) when exiting the desktop. Panel also interfaces with session-manager when exiting the desktop and managing "saved" sessions when launching the desktop. nautilus : Manages desktop icons and provides a file manager. gdm : GNOME Display Manager (login screen) This handles X-Authentication, netwrk desktop access (XDMCP), graphical login prompt, logos, ... GNOME VFS: Uses mime types for transparent file access. Window manager. None specified. Can use Metacity, Sawfish, ... Component management: D-Bus: cross-desktop message bus for sending events between various applications, the desktop, and...
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Sublime Text is an awesome text editor. If you’ve never heard of it, you should check it out right now.

I’ve made this tutorial because there’s no installer for the Linux versions of Sublime Text. While that’s not a real problem, I feel there is a cleaner way to go around this. Also, this post will show you how to integrate Sublime Text to Unity (which, I’m glad to report, has now matured into a fully functional user interface). So let’s get on with this. Here is my how to install Sublime Text on Ubuntu tutorial.

[This tutorial has been updated following feedback from AskUbuntu. Also, you need to do these steps using your login. Do not start by typing “sudo -s”!]

Step 1

Download the tarfile that suits you best and extract it. Here’s the command to extract tar.bz2 files:

tar xf Sublime\ Text\ 2.0.1\ x64.tar.bz2

You’ll notice that I got the 64-bit version. The reason is that it’s lightning fast. So, go for that if you can!

Step...

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In Ubuntu 14.04, 13.10 and 13.04

, Unity (and Compiz) are using Gsettings and because of this,

the "unity --reset" command used to reset Unity in previous Ubuntu versions doesn't work anymore

. In case some settings are messed up and you want to reset Unity and Compiz to their default settings, here's a new way of doing this that works with Ubuntu 14.04 Trusty Tahr, 13.10 Saucy Salamander and 13.04 Raring Ringtail.

Update: this article was initially for Ubuntu 12.10 and 13.04. I subsequently tested new Ubuntu releases and these instructions work with Ubuntu 13.10 and 14.04 as well.

Reset Unity & Compiz in Ubuntu 14.04, 13.10 or 13.04



A. The first method is using a tool that tries to replicate the old "unity --reset" behaviour.

Unity Reset tool can be downloaded from

HERE

and it should work with

Ubuntu 14.04, 13.10 and 13.04.

Or get the script from HERE.

Then, reset Unity using the following command:

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