What is nss-myhostname? And why is it not installable?

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Originally Posted by

kend650

Why am I getting this line in my dmesg file: [12531.694935] systemd-hostnamed[4495]: Warning: nss-myhostname is not installed. Changing the local hostname might make it unresolveable. Please install nss-myhostname!

I am not experiencing any problems, but don't like seeing this type of message in my boot logs.

Any ideas on why or work arounds??

Ken

This is probably a result of the incorporation of some of systemd into Upstart routines. See here.

A Google search reveals these items.

My guess is that the /etc/hostname isn't quite correct. On the other hand the error message is quite specific -- Warning: nss-myhostname is not installed. Changing the local hostname might make it unresolveable. Please install nss-myhostname!.

This is all very bleeding edge so who knows what the ramifications are. I believe if you configure your networking manually via the standard files (/etc/hosts and /etc/network/interfaces)...

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nss-myhostname 0.3

Copyright 2005-2011 Lennart Poettering

This program is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify it under the terms of the GNU Lesser General Public License as published by the Free Software Foundation, either version 2.1 of the License, or (at your option) any later version.

This program is distributed in the hope that it will be useful, but WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. See the GNU Lesser General Public License for more details.

Version 0.3 released. Changes include: Always return locally configured IP addresses first, use 127.0.0.2/::1 only as fallback if no addresses are configured.

Version 0.2 released. Changes include: Update for IPv6 and newest glibc NSS interfaces

Version 0.1 released. Initial release.

nss-myhostname is a plugin for the GNU Name Service Switch (NSS) functionality of the GNU C Library (glibc) providing host...

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In dmesg I get:

[ 46.109601] systemd-udevd[2297]: failed to execute '/lib/udev/socket:@/org/freedesktop/hal/udev_event' 'socket:@/org/freedesktop/hal/udev_event': No such file or directory
[ 49.265654] systemd-udevd[2427]: failed to execute '/lib/udev/socket:@/org/freedesktop/hal/udev_event' 'socket:@/org/freedesktop/hal/udev_event': No such file or directory
[ 206.567159] systemd-hostnamed[3523]: Warning: nss-myhostname is not installed. Changing the local hostname might make it unresolveable. Please install nss-myhostname!

I try to install nss-myhostname package but it doesn't exist. I only see related packages like nsscache,nss-passwords or nss-updatedb

ProblemType: Bug
DistroRelease: Ubuntu 13.10
Package: systemd-services 202-0ubuntu10
ProcVersionSignature: Ubuntu 3.8.0-13.23-generic 3.8.3
Uname: Linux 3.8.0-13-generic i686
ApportVersion: 2.10.2-0ubuntu1
Architecture: i386
Date: Thu May 30 00:31:32 2013
...

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Many applications rely on a fully qualified domain name and won’t work properly or even fail to start without one. For example, even if your hostname is correctly set up, apache won’t start with the default configuration on Fedora 19 if your DNS server cannot resolve the hostname:

But fortunately there’s a plugin to the GNU Name Service Switch (NSS) of glibc called nss-myhostname that ensures, that the local hostname is always resolvable.

Since Fedora 19, nss-myhostname is no longer a separate package but part of the systemd package. To enable the plugin, open /etc/nsswitch.conf with you favourite editor and add myhostname to the line starting with...

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DESCRIPTION

nss-myhostname is a plug-in module for the GNU Name Service Switch (NSS) functionality of the GNU C Library (glibc), primarily providing hostname resolution for the locally configured system hostname as returned by gethostname(2). The precise hostnames resolved by this module are:

• The local, configured hostname is resolved to all locally configured IP addresses ordered by their scope, or --- if none are configured --- the IPv4 address 127.0.0.2 (which is on the local loopback) and the IPv6 address ::1 (which is the local host). • The hostnames "localhost" and "localhost.localdomain" (as well as any hostname ending in ".localhost" or ".localhost.localdomain") are resolved to the IP addresses 127.0.0.1 and ::1. • The hostname "gateway" is resolved to all current default routing gateway addresses, ordered by their metric. This assigns a stable hostname to the current gateway, useful for referencing it independently of the current network configuration state....
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Description of problem: Using systemd this warning is shown in /var/log/warnings: Sep 16 18:12:43 dvg systemd-hostnamed[21523]: Warning: nss-myhostname is not installed. Changing the local hostname might make it unresolveable. Please install nss-myhostname! Also see this reference please: http://0pointer.de/lennart/projects/nss-myhostname/ reading inter alia: nss-myhostname is a plugin for the GNU Name Service Switch (NSS) functionality of the GNU C Library (glibc) providing host name resolution for the locally configured system hostname as returned by gethostname(2). Various software relies on an always resolvable local host name. When using dynamic hostnames this is usually achieved by patching /etc/hosts at the same time as changing the host name. This however is not ideal since it requires a writable /etc file system and is fragile because the file might be edited by the administrator at the same time. nss-myhostname simply returns all locally configure public IP addresses, or --...
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On Wed, Apr 15, 2015 at 6:49 AM, Adam Funk

[hidden email]

> wrote:

>

> I'm getting the

>

> systemd-hostnamed[15205]: Warning: nss-myhostname is not

> installed. Changing the local hostname might make it

> unresolveable. Please install nss-myhostname!

>

> message in my logcheck output. Looking it up says not to install the

> equivalent package but to fix the /etc/hosts file.

>

>

https://askubuntu.com/questions/453072/what-is-nss-myhostname-and-why-is-it-not-installable

>

>

> This is on a recent clean install of 14.04, upgraded immediately to

> 14.10 (because someone in the office had a 14.04 CD handy), using

> DHCP. I have not manually altered any of the networking stuff since

> the installation. The only thing possibly funny that I see in

> /etc/hosts is that the "127.0.0.1 localhost" line is followed by one

> with "127.0.0.1" and the...

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I was curious myself, and i didnt like any of the other answer because they didnt seem to answer what i was looking for atleast.

The Answer: Looking back at this doc it almost appears as if Thomas was stating is giving it another dedicated ip on the loopback allows it to be canonical.

Both point to your loopback. Using the following 127.0.1.1 is an actual IP, on the loopback, whereas 127.0.0.1 is either the device itself, or another ip on the loopback. Both end up on the same subnet, representing the loopback, but are separated by ip. They are equivalent dns wise, but separated because of having dedicated ip.

The point being, you can have all your entries on one line like this

127.0.0.1 localhost localhost.domain www.myfakednsname.com myakednsname.com

If your hostname is local, meaning doesn't have a global internet DNS entry mapped to an actual internet ip, then in this case Thomas was saying you NEED TO have the 2nd entry line, like this to...

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What is SSL?

SSL (Secure Sockets Layer) is a standard technology behind establishing an encrypted connection between a web server (host) and a web browser (client). This connection between the two makes sure that all the data passed between them remain private and intrinsic. SSL is an industry standard and is used by millions of websites to protect their online transactions with their customers. If you have ever visited a website using the https:// in the address bar you were creating a secure connection via SSL. If you have an eshop or sell items via your website, SSL helps in establishing trust with your customers.

Understanding how the SSL connection protects your data

Using an SSL certificate creates an encrypted connection between the user's web browser and the web server. This means that any data transmitted between the web server and the web browser can not be read without first being decrypted. This protects the data from being spied upon by someone...

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nss-myhostname

is a plug-in module for the GNU Name Service Switch (NSS) functionality of the GNU C Library (

glibc

), primarily providing hostname resolution for the locally configured system hostname as returned by

gethostname(2)

. The precise hostnames resolved by this module are:

o

o

o

Various software relies on an always-resolvable local hostname. When using dynamic hostnames, this is traditionally achieved by patching /etc/hosts at the same time as changing the hostname. This is problematic since it requires a writable /etc file system and is fragile because the file might be edited by the administrator at the same time. With nss-myhostname enabled, changing /etc/hosts is unnecessary, and on many systems, the file becomes entirely optional.

To activate the NSS modules, add "myhostname" to the line starting with "hosts:" in /etc/nsswitch.conf.

It is recommended to place "myhostname" last in the nsswitch.conf "hosts:" line...

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Section: nss-myhostname (8)
Updated:
Index Return to Main Contents

NAME

nss-myhostname, libnss_myhostname.so.2 - Provide hostname resolution for the locally configured system hostname.

SYNOPSIS

libnss_myhostname.so.2

DESCRIPTION

nss-myhostname is a plugin for the GNU Name Service Switch (NSS) functionality of the GNU C Library (glibc) primarily providing hostname resolution for the locally configured system hostname as returned by gethostname(2). The precise hostnames resolved by this module are:

• The local, configured hostname is resolved to all locally configured IP addresses ordered by their scope, or --- if none are configured --- the IPv4 address 127.0.0.2 (which is on the local loopback) and the IPv6 address ::1 (which is the local host). • The hostname "localhost" is resolved to the IP addresses 127.0.0.1 and ::1. • The hostname "gateway" is resolved to all current default routing gateway addresses, ordered by their metric....
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That "nss-myhostname" message & correcting the /etc/hosts file Tom H tomh0665 at gmail.com
Wed Apr 15 15:42:33 UTC 2015 On Wed, Apr 15, 2015 at 6:49 AM, Adam Funk wrote: > > I'm getting the > > systemd-hostnamed[15205]: Warning: nss-myhostname is not > installed. Changing the local hostname might make it > unresolveable. Please install nss-myhostname! > > message in my logcheck output. Looking it up says not to install the > equivalent package but to fix the /etc/hosts file. > > > > This is on a recent clean install of 14.04, upgraded immediately to > 14.10 (because someone in the office had a 14.04 CD handy), using > DHCP. I have not manually altered any of the networking stuff since > the installation. The only thing possibly funny that I see in > /etc/hosts is that the "127.0.0.1 localhost" line is followed by one > with "127.0.0.1" and the hostname that the DHCP server gave (in fully > qualified and short forms). > > Should I delete the second line? > > Why does...
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I'm getting the

systemd-hostnamed[15205]: Warning: nss-myhostname is not installed. Changing the local hostname might make it unresolveable. Please install nss-myhostname!

message in my logcheck output. Looking it up says not to install the equivalent package but to fix the /etc/hosts file.

This is on a recent clean install of 14.04, upgraded immediately to 14.10 (because someone in the office had a 14.04 CD handy), using DHCP. I have not manually altered any of the networking stuff since the installation. The only thing possibly funny that I see in /etc/hosts is that the "127.0.0.1 localhost" line is followed by one with "127.0.0.1" and the hostname that the DHCP server gave (in fully qualified and short forms).

Should I delete the second line?

Why does the Ubuntu installation set up /etc/hosts wrong?

Thanks,...

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I am doing a lot of embedded Linux work lately. The machines we use configure their hostname depending on some external configuration options. They boot from a CF card, which is mostly mounted read-only. Since the hostname changes often but we wanted to use sudo we had a problem: sudo requires the local host name to be resolvable using gethostbyname(). On Debian this is usually done by patching /etc/hosts correctly. Unfortunately that file resides on a read-only partition. Instead of hacking some ugly symlink based solution I decided to fix it the right way and wrote a tiny NSS module which does nothing more than mapping the hostname to the IP address 127.0.0.2 (and back). (That IP address is on the loopback device, but is not identical to localhost.)

Get nss-myhostname while it is hot!

BTW: This tool I wrote is pretty useful on embedded machines too, and certainly easier to use than setterm -dump 1 -file /dev/stdout | fold -w 80. And it does color too. And looping....

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...
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An update:

Novell have told us today that this is a ZLM defect, so presumably it

will be fixed in a patch at some point.

Although I would say its an OES defect, not ZLM!

Tom

On Fri, 02 Mar 2007 11:03:07 +0000, Tom Eggleston wrote:

Thanks Rainer.

That is extremely interesting - I wish I had known this last week!

We have had some significant problems building these servers, not least

that the LUM installation fails through Yast, and has to be forced with

namconfig (it gives an error complaining about not being able to modify

/etc/nsswitch.conf). As LUM is so central to everything, it has caused

major problems. I wonder now if the problem is that we patched the server

before trying the install with Yast?

Cheers

Tom

On Thu, 01 Mar 2007 19:13:04 +0000, Rainer Brunold wrote:

bject: Re: ZLM / OES Conflict

From: Rainer Brunold...

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