Should I upgrade to the “mainline” kernels?

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If you know of a specific fix or improvement in how the newer kernel handles your hardware, I say go for it.

I would not have upgraded to a mainline kernel due to lack of support, except that I was having some trouble with N64 game emulation running very sluggishly with lots of bugs. After trying every configuration I could find for the emulator as well as xorg, I read Here's Why Radeon Graphics Are Faster On Linux 3.12. This was enough to motivate me to test it and the results in appearance and performance were amazing with no new problems arising as of yet.

One thing to note is whether you have external modules (aka out-of-tree) installed (see Indentify out of tree modules to get an idea where these are). If you need these modules, consider whether they will build against the new kernel version. Do some research and test them yourself on the new kernel version. Worse case scenario, you can boot into the previous kernel version and uninstall the new one.

It is...

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by

Suchith JN

Last Updated February 20, 2017 01:02 AM

Currently I'm running Linux-3.0 and I want to update it to Linux-3.3.1 the latest stable kernel release as mentioned at http://www.kernel.org. Can I update to 3.3.1 in Ubuntu without any risk of crashes? I'm updating my kernel regularly as provided by the Update Manager..Currently I have Linux-3.0.0.17..Can I update?

NOTE:

The latest kernel version any user is supposed to use in Ubuntu is updated automatically via the Update Manager, so no action is normally required by user regarding kernel upgrades. What the question author is referring to is mainline kernel, see: Should I upgrade to the "mainline" kernels?

Answers 9

As you've seen, Ubuntu does provide versions of the Linux kernel, but not always as fast as they are released upstream, you can always compile the 3.3.1 kernel yourself, but that may be more effort than you were looking for. If not, search around and I'm sure you'll...

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Upgrade Linux Kernel 4.6.1 stable on Ubuntu 16.04 Xenial Xerus, Ubuntu 15.10 wily werewolf, Ubuntu 15.04 vivid Vervet, ubuntu 14.10 Utopic Unicorn, Ubuntu 14.04 Trusty Tahr (LTS), Linux Mint 17.1, Linux Mint 17.2, Linux Mint 17.3 and other Ubuntu derivative systems

Linux kernel

is the essential part of any Linux operating system. It is responsible for resource allocation, low-level hardware interfaces, security, simple communications, basic file system management, and more. Written from scratch by Linus Torvalds (with help from various developers), Linux is a clone of the UNIX operating system. It is geared towards POSIX and Single UNIX Specification compliances.

Includes powerful features

Linux provides users with powerful features, such as true multitasking, multistack networking, shared copy-on-write executables, shared libraries, demand loading, virtual memory, and proper memory management.

Initially designed only for...

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Periodically new devices and technology coming out and it’s important to keep our Linux system kernel up-to-date if we want to get the most of out it. Moreover, updating system kernel will ease us to take advantage of new kernel fuctions and also it helps us to protect ourselves from vulnerabilities that have been found in earlier versions.

Suggested Read: How to Upgrade Kernel in CentOS 7

Ready to update your kernel on Ubuntu or one of their derivatives such as Debian and Linux Mint? If so, keep reading!

Step 1: Check Installed Kernel Version

To find the current version of installed kernel on our system we can do:

$ uname -sr

The following image shows the output of the above command in a Ubuntu 16.04 server:

Check Kernel Version in Ubuntu

Step 2: Upgrading Kernel in Ubuntu

To upgrade the kernel in Ubuntu, go to http://kernel.ubuntu.com/~kernel-ppa/mainline/ and choose the desired version (Kernel 4.15 is the latest at the...

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Thanks, tell, I should have been told that, because I'm back in 3.19.0-32, because its using the proprietary amd radeon driver... In 4.4.-0.59, the screen would have trouble catching the text fast enough in an Audacious playlist, then I looked at the Drivers and it was using the "recommended" ati driver there, so for now it'll sit in the backburner, like Windows 7 x64, I messed up after making a perfect install when now win7 updates do not contain any win10 "telemetry" in the updates. I got a license for Driver-Genius 16, well I had it for 15 but it was bought in the summer (the serial) so it still works for win7. I should have known better than trust it and let it install and AMD Chipset driver, I did all the drivers I could from the Asus website relating to my motherboard, I only need DG for the peripherals I have added. After it failed installing, usually it's not a big deal, if I start such an amd catalyst driver update and there is nothing to update, all boxes will be checked...

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The Linux Kernel is the core of the Ubuntu operating system. The Linux Kernel is a monolithic Unix-like kernel for computer operating systems, it has been created by Linux Torvalds and is used by all Linux distributions including Ubuntu, CentOS, OpenSuSE, ReadHat and Debian.

In this tutorial, I will show you how to upgrade the Ubuntu kernel to use the latest mainline kernel build provided by the Ubuntu kernel Team. I will be using Ubuntu 16.04.2 Xenial Xerus with default kernel version 4.4 as basis upgrade it to the 4.11.2 kernel version.

What is a 'Mainline Kernel Build'?

The Mainline Kernel Build is just a vanilla kernel from kernel.org packaged as a deb package. The Canonical Kernel Team builds and customizes the kernel sources for Ubuntu and builds it as .deb package for easy installation with the apt package manager. The Mainline kernel should only be used if you need latest kernel features, it is potentially less stable as the production kernels that ship...

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Originally Posted by

banceu_sergiu_ione

That is not a ppa, is a wiki.

You don't say ?

I am referring to the "kernel-ppa" in:

http://kernel.ubuntu.com/~kernel-ppa/mainline/?C=N;O=D

Originally Posted by

banceu_sergiu_ione

Check your kernel version with :

and post the output.

And then? I am currently being booted into the Xenial (4.4) kernel:

Code:

uname -a Linux pc 4.4.0-34-generic #53-Ubuntu SMP Wed Jul 27 16:06:39 UTC 2016 x86_64 x86_64 x86_64 GNU/Linux Yes, I realize that -34 stands for the update number. But that is just a security or bug fix update, not a real update to a new kernel. Xenial stays on kernel 4.4 over the entire life of Xenial.

Yes, I know it's possible to upgrade to the Ubuntu+1 kernel via the LTS enablement stacks. But it takes months for them to arrive. And when they arrive, they are already outdated.

What's so hard to understand about the fact that someone wants to stay up-to-date on the...

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Currently I'm running Linux-3.0 and I want to update it to Linux-3.3.1 the latest stable kernel release as mentioned at http://www.kernel.org. Can I update to 3.3.1 in Ubuntu without any risk of crashes? I'm updating my kernel regularly as provided by the Update Manager..Currently I have Linux-3.0.0.17..Can I update?

NOTE:

The latest kernel version any user is supposed to use in Ubuntu is updated automatically via the Update Manager, so no action is normally required by user regarding kernel upgrades. What the question author is referring to is mainline kernel, see: Should I upgrade to the "mainline" kernels?

The simplest set of instructions I always used for kernel upgrade / downgrade are by ubuntuforums.org user by the name of lykwydchykyn (url modified by me for this post):

Go here: http://kernel.ubuntu.com/~kernel-ppa/mainline/

Download 3 (maybe 4) debs to a folder somewhere:

linux-headers-VERSION-NUMBER_all.deb...
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Newer "mainline" versions of the kernel are available from the Ubuntu kernel team, e.g. 3.4 and 3.5, while Ubuntu 12.04 is on 3.2.

What are the mainline kernels? Are they better than my existing kernel? What are the pros and cons of upgrading to a mainline kernel? Will I easily be able to go back?

Most of the basic information in this answer is from the Mainline Builds wiki

1. They are provided only for testing and are unsupported

The mainline kernels are built from the latest unmodified "mainline" Linux kernel sources. The Ubuntu kernel team provides these only for testing and debugging purposes, to see whether issues have been fixed "upstream", i.e. by the Linux kernel developers. They are therefore not supported and must be used at your own risk; you can report possible bugs to kernel.org via kernel-oops, or if you want a faster solution, try posting to the Linux Kernel Mailing List

2. They will often break drivers, especially Nvidia/AMD and wireless...

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#build #ubuntu #server

#

On this page

The Linux Kernel is the core of the Ubuntu operating system. The Linux Kernel is a monolithic Unix-like kernel for computer operating systems, it has been created by Linux Torvalds and is used by all Linux distributions including Ubuntu, CentOS, OpenSuSE, ReadHat and Debian.

In this tutorial, I will show you how to upgrade the Ubuntu kernel to use the latest mainline kernel build provided by the Ubuntu kernel Team. I will be using Ubuntu 16.04.2 Xenial Xerus with default kernel version 4.4 as basis upgrade it to the 4.11.2 kernel version.

What is a ‘Mainline Kernel Build’?

The Mainline Kernel Build is just a vanilla kernel from kernel.org packaged as a deb package. The Canonical Kernel Team builds and customizes the kernel sources for Ubuntu and builds it as .deb package for easy installation with the apt package manager. The Mainline kernel should only be used if you need latest kernel features, it is...

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Guys, please help.

I installed one orange pi plus 2e and orange pi one in following way: first server image (legacy kernel) then kernel upgrade to mainline.

Everything works just fine, except I do not receive kernel updates.

If I understood well, kernel should be upgraded via apt dist-upgrade.. But nothing.

On both this machines I've got same situation:

Welcome to ARMBIAN 5.31 stable Ubuntu 16.04.3 LTS 4.11.5-sun8i

igor@orangepione:~$ uname -a
Linux orangepione 4.11.5-sun8i #11 SMP Fri Jun 23 20:03:23 CEST 2017 armv7l armv7l armv7l GNU/Linux

in my apt sources I have:

igor@orangepione:~$ grep -h ^deb /etc/apt/sources.list /etc/apt/sources.list.d/*
deb http://ports.ubuntu.com/ xenial main restricted universe multiverse
deb http://ports.ubuntu.com/ xenial-security main restricted universe multiverse
deb http://ports.ubuntu.com/ xenial-updates main restricted universe multiverse
deb...

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By default, Ubuntu systems run with the Ubuntu kernels provided by the Ubuntu repositories. However it is handy to be able to test with unmodified upstream kernels to help locate problems in the Ubuntu kernel patches, or to confirm that upstream has fixed a specific issue. To this end we now offer select upstream kernel builds. These kernels are made from unmodified kernel source but using the Ubuntu kernel configuration files. These are then packaged as Ubuntu .deb files for simple installation.

These kernels are not supported and are not appropriate for production use.

The upstream kernels archive is located at the URL below. There is a directory for each build. Note, if you are testing for a bug, please do not use the daily folder, but use the latest mainline kernel at the top:

The tagged releases (as made by Linus and the stable maintainers) are found under a directory matching their tag name and which kernel configuration they were built with (-). Daily...

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Ever wondered how to install new kernel releases on Ubuntu?

Using Ukuu (which stands for ‘Ubuntu Kernel Update Utility’) is one way to do it. This straightforward desktop app help you install a new kernel in Ubuntu, Linux Mint, and other Ubuntu-based distributions, using the “mainline” kernels published by Canonical.

But before you jump ahead in pursuit of shiny new things, a quick proviso is required because, generally, this is not something you want to do.

What is a mainline kernel?

Mainline kernels may be provided by the Ubuntu Kernel Team but they’re intended for testing purposes only.

Mainline kernels are not supported in the same way that a regular, run of the mill rep versions offered through the regular update channels or via the LTS HWE process.

These kernels are unmodified upstream kernels and are built using Ubuntu kernel configuration files.

You should not assume these kernels will be reliable enough for...

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Linux for System z, also known as Linux/390, is the native port of Linux to the S/390 and IBM System z hardware platforms. It runs on the bare hardware, in an LPAR and as a VM, or z/VM guest.

LinuxVM.org is the official home of the Linux/390 project. The purpose of the project is to provide a central source of Linux/390 information and software, and to explore the possibilities of Linux and CP integration or interoperation.

There is a nascent wiki dealing with Linux on z/VM at wiki.linuxvm.org that is intended to be another resource for community-provided technical information.

The list of Linux/390 Redbooks was getting a little too unwieldy to remain on the front page, so it has been moved to its own page.

12/11/2011 - New mainline Linux kernel updates for System z from git390.marist.edu.

commit 35337c834124d2893b7fe4ba683c7639e6c37e0c Merge: 8c9b04346c0ae302d8b7b7df16cc19ddff77742e 75464960fc0ccc505527edc1459c8ad191fbc0cc Author:...
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Android + Chrome OS = Future

Google is bringing millions of Android app to Chromebooks with the launch of Google Play for Chrome OS — but not every device will be able to join in the fun.

Google has a list of Chromebooks that support Android apps and, rather shockingly, a number of best-selling devices are not on the list.

Find out if your device is among them by looking at the list below.

Which Chromebooks Will Support Android Apps?

Below is a list of Chromebooks that will support running Android apps.

If your Chromebook is a couple of years old then there’s a good chance that you’ll get access to millions of Android app later this year.

Many older Chrome OS devices sadly won’t.

Among the well-known devices to miss out is the original Google Chromebook Pixel, released in 2013, the best-selling Acer C720 Chromebook, and every Chromebase model released so far.

It’s also worth noting that not every Chromebook...

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Normally Linux distribution ISOs work perfectly when written to a USB for booting as a 'Live USB' allowing both usage and installation of the distro. Unfortunately with the introduction of Intel Atom based mini PCs and tablets the issue of requiring a 32-bit bootloader to boot a 64-bit OS arose. Further complications were caused by the initial lack of 'mainline' support for HDMI audio and wifi/bluetooth resulting in either the need for custom kernels or for one of the more recent 'mainline' kernels. However because Ubuntu is not a 'rolling release' it is not possible to try the latest kernel or a specific kernel with a 'Live USB'. Now with the introduction of Intel Apollo Lake based mini PCs a new issue has arisen where GRUB simply fails to boot unless the device is one of the few with a BIOS option to select Linux as the OS. Whilst some Linux distros can work OOTB regardless of architecture and bootloader I found that for Ubuntu it wasn't that simple.

To solve the limitations...

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