Quickly place a window to another screen using only the keyboard

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I know that using Alt-F7, I can use the keyboard to move the window around. I can also use the “Grid” plugin of Compiz to position quickly the window around my current monitor. The grid plugin doesn’t seem work across monitor however.

What I need is a quicker way to move the current window to the other screen. In my current dual-monitor setup, I find myself needing to move the focus window to the other monitor as I focus on working on something else (and move it back afterward).

If I use XMonad (or other tiling managers), this would be rather easy. However, many applications that I use (Gnome Do, MATLAB, image viewers, custom apps that I write, …) do not work well with a tiling manager.

So my question is: is there a shortcut key combination that moves the currently focused window to the other monitor (and...

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Windows 7: One of the best features of Windows 7 is its keyboard support for moving and arranging application windows. Press the Win key and an arrow key to easily dock windows side-by-side, maximize them, minimize them, and move them to another monitor.

These are the killer shortcuts for manipulating the active window:

Win+Left arrow: Snap to the left half of the screen Win+RIght arrow: Snap to the right half of the screen Win+Up arrow: Maximize the window Win+Down arrow: Minimize/Restore if it's maximized

If you have more than one monitor:

Win+Shift+Left arrow: Move window to the monitor on the left Win+Shift+Right arrow: Move window to the monitor on the right

I use the Win+Left arrow and Win+Right arrow all the time on Windows, for comparing documents side-by-side or just keeping the browser open for reference while writing in another window. I'd go so far as to say the Win+arrow key shortcuts are a pretty good reason to upgrade to Windows 7 if you...

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How many times a day does your computer interface emit its glow into an empty room for endless minutes, until the power management kicks in and turns the screen off? Computer monitors consume a significant amount of energy and it could be reduced dramatically by simply turning the screen off whenever it’s not needed. Unfortunately, Windows does not offer a convenient shortcut for this task.

Less Than Optimal Manual & Automatic Solutions

There are of course various solutions to this problem. You could for example turn off your monitor manually. The downside is that the average screen won’t wake up in response to moving the mouse, you will have to turn it on manually.

Have you ever tried to turn off a laptop screen? Most laptops don’t offer this feature anymore or it is well hidden. While you could optimize your power management settings to only turn off the screen when you close the lid, that again requires a lot of manual intervention.

Another...

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When it comes to taking screenshots in Windows, the Print Screen key is crucial. Most Windows-based keyboards have a Print Screen key, so it’s usually not an issue. But what if you’re running Windows on a Mac via Boot Camp? Apple’s compact keyboards don’t have a Print Screen key so, absent third party software, how do you take screenshots when booted into Windows on your Mac?

Thankfully, Apple accounted for this issue by mapping the traditional Windows Print Screen key to a keyboard shortcut. With the default Apple keyboard found on the MacBooks or the Apple Wireless Keyboard, you can use the following shortcut combinations to capture Windows screenshots to the clipboard:

Capture the Entire Screen: Function + Shift + F11
Capture Only the Active Window: Function + Shift + Option + F11

Note that unlike OS X screenshots, these key combinations don’t place an image file somewhere on your computer. Instead, just as in Windows natively, the captured screen or...

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Keyboard shortcuts can boost your productivity if your daily job relies heavily on using Windows. They just don’t get the work done quickly, but also improves the efficiency. Give them a try and you just might find yourself getting addicted to keyboard shortcuts.

We’ve compiled a list of keyboard shortcuts for Windows 190 + shortcuts grouped into categories for easy access. If we missed some shortcut in this list, kindly let us know through the comments section.

Here are the shortcuts to get to the shortcuts:

Note: Some of the shortcuts given below may not work for versions below Windows 8.

General Shortcuts

Let’s kickstart the list with the most common shortcuts that you’ll often use.

F1 [Display Help] F2 [Rename the selected item] F3 [Search for a file or folder] F4 [Display the address bar list in File Explorer] F5 [Refresh the active window] F6 [Cycle through screen elements in a window or on the desktop] F10 [Activate the Menu...
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You’ve probably run into the situation at home or at the office where you were doing something confidential on the computer and someone else came by right at that time. If you haven’t planned ahead of time, the only thing you could do is try to minimize the application, which is fairly slow and will give the other person enough time to see what you were doing.

In this article, I’m going to show you a couple of methods for quickly hiding your applications and windows, some of which will be more obvious than others. Depending on who you are trying to hide the windows from (boss, kids, wife, etc), your optimal method may be different.

CTRL + ALT + DEL

My favorite method by far is to simply press CTRL + ALT + DEL and then press Enter. By default the Lock Computer button is highlighted. Pressing the three keys will bring up a dialog with a few options like Lock this computer, Switch user, Log off etc. Pressing Enter will automatically select Lock this...

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If you use Emoji characters often in OS X, you’ll enjoy knowing there is a very fast keystroke to immediately access a special Mac Emoji character panel from anywhere text entry is possible in OS X. Additionally, you can navigate within this quick Emoji panel entirely with the keyboard, which makes typing Emoji on the Mac quite a bit faster than using the traditional Emoji character access panel.


The Mac Emoji keyboard shortcut is really easy to remember: Command + Control + Spacebar

Hitting that key combination will immediately bring up a little Emoji-only character panel, which is basically a condensed version of the larger Special Characters panel, and limited exclusively to the Emoji icon set.

The Mac Quick Emoji Keystroke: Command + Control + Space

Once the Emoji character panel is shown on screen, you can use the arrow keys to navigate around in the Emoji icon set, then hit the Return key to place the selected Emoji...

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Why You Need SizeUp for Window Management

Arranging windows on Mac OS X is tedious and imprecise. Even after dragging, pulling, and, re-dragging windows, you end up with inefficient use of your available screen real estate.

SizeUp will help you quickly resize and position your windows to make optimal use of your screen while saving you time and frustration.

SizeUp at Your Command

SizeUp comes with a number of pre-defined actions for resizing and/or moving the frontmost window of almost any application.

Safari, Finder, Pages, it doesn't matter, SizeUp will work its magic to help wrangle your windows into place.

Split Screen Actions

Move and resize a window to fill the Left, Right, Top (Up), or Bottom (Down) half of the screen.

Great for putting two windows side by side for comparison.

Quarter Screen Actions

Move and resize a window to fill a quarter of the screen (quadrant).

Great for managing files in...

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Throughout this guide, the keyword $mod will be used to refer to the configured modifier. This is the Alt key (Mod1) by default, with the Windows key (Mod4) being a popular alternative.

2.1. Opening terminals and moving around

One very basic operation is opening a new terminal. By default, the keybinding for this is $mod+Enter, that is Alt+Enter (Mod1+Enter) in the default configuration. By pressing $mod+Enter, a new terminal will be opened. It will fill the whole space available on your screen.

If you now open another terminal, i3 will place it next to the current one, splitting the screen size in half. Depending on your monitor, i3 will put the created window beside the existing window (on wide displays) or below the existing window (rotated displays).

To move the focus between the two terminals, you can use the direction keys which you may know from the editor vi. However, in i3, your homerow is used for these keys (in vi, the...

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I know that using Alt+F7, I can use the keyboard to move the window around. I can also use the "Grid" plugin of Compiz to position quickly the window around my current monitor. The grid plugin doesn't seem work across monitor however.

What I need is a quicker way to move the current window to the other screen. In my current dual-monitor setup, I find myself needing to move the focus window to the other monitor as I focus on working on something else (and move it back afterward).

If I use XMonad (or other tiling managers), this would be rather easy. However, many applications that I use (Gnome Do, MATLAB, image viewers, custom apps that I write, ...) do not work well with a tiling manager.

So my question is: is there a shortcut key combination that moves the currently focused window to the other monitor (and...

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If you’ve ever hooked up your laptop to a secondary monitor and then disconnected without remembering to move the windows back to the primary desktop, you’ve probably encounted this problem:

The application is running. You can see it in the taskbar, but you can’t see it on the screen, because it still thinks it’s running on the secondary monitor.В You try and use right-click, Move, but that doesn’t do anything, and the window doesn’t move anywhere. You end up rebooting and cursing Microsoft.

Getting В Your Hidden Window Back with Cascade Windows

The easiest way to get back a hidden window is to just right-click on the Taskbar and select “Cascade windows”.

This will immediately cascade all of the open windows like this, moving your window back onto the screen:

If that doesn’t work, proceed with the keyboard trick below.

Getting Your Hidden Window Back with the Keyboard Trick

There’s a simple trick to get around...

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The keystrokes listed here are in tables and are grouped by headings. Major divisions are level two headings. Use the JAWS List of Headings (INSERT+F6) or the navigation quick key, H, to move quickly to the section of your choice. You can also use the navigation quick key, T, to move from one table to the next. Use the SHIFT key in combination with most navigation quick keys to move backwards.

New JAWS Keystrokes

Layered Keystrokes

Layered keystrokes are keystrokes that require you to first press and release INSERT+SPACEBAR, and then press a different key to perform a function in JAWS. Layered keystrokes are easy to use and remember, and they do not interfere with native keystrokes within applications. Once you enter a layer, press the QUESTION MARK key to get a list of available keyboard commands within that layer.


JAWS Tandem Session Keystrokes

Web Pages and HTML

Navigation quick keys make it faster and easier to move...

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dotTech has reviewed the best free screenshot programs for Windows. However, screenshot programs aren’t for everyone and some people like to stick with the ole fashion Print Screen -> paste in Microsoft Paint method. The issue with tapping Print Screen to take a screenshot is it takes a screenshot of your whole screen. Sometimes this is desirable while other times it is not. The good news is Windows has the ability to take a screenshot of just your active window or program, too — so you don’t have to be forced to take a snapshot of your whole screen. This article shows you how to do just that

WHAT IS ‘ACTIVE WINDOW’?

Before you learn a trick on how to take a screenshot of the active window, it is a good idea to actually know what ‘active window’ means.

It is actually pretty simple. ‘Active window’ is simply the window or program that you are currently in — the window or program that you are actively using. For example, let’s say you have three windows...

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Hot Virtual Keyboard makes previous-generation on-screen keyboards look ancient. Type faster with configurable mouse gestures, launch programs, browse the Internet, and run programmable macros with any of the 70 keyboards included with Hot Virtual Keyboard. The new virtual on-screen keyboard employs advanced typing techniques used in modern mobile phones and communicators, including word auto-complete allowing you to choose the right word with a single click after entering just one or two letters.

Users of Tablet PC, UMPC, Panel PC, Car PC and similar touch-screen devices will find Hot Virtual Keyboard indispensable. Use a mouse, touchpad or fingers for on-screen typing. With Hot Virtual Keyboard, you can type faster and more conveniently than by using built-in Windows On-Screen Keyboard. Use gestures for quickly performing repeat operations such as shifting the case of the letters, specify applications to hide Hot Virtual Keyboard from, and set your own hotkeys to...

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While the Windows 8/8.1 was designed for touchscreen, the latest Windows 10 is optimized for touch screen input and works equally well with traditional input methods such as mouse and keyboard. The lock screen, Start, and Settings have specially been designed for touchscreen.

The new tablet mode in Windows 10 makes it easy to use on a device that supports touch input. When it tablet mode, full screen Start appears, icons are nicely placed on the File Explorer, and icons on the taskbar are also nicely placed for easy touch input.

Disabling touch screen

Now, if you’re running Windows 10/8.1 on a touch device, you might want to temporarily disable the touch input (touch screen) so that you can use it as a laptop by connecting a pair of keyboard and mice to your device. As you have discovered by now, Windows 10/8.1 doesn’t include an option to disable the touch input or touch screen, and surprisingly, there is not even a single third-party tool to for this...

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