How to use Alt+Shift to switch keyboard layouts?

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A confirmed bug in Ubuntu 13.10 prevents users from switching layouts using combinations like Alt+Shift, Caps Lock, Ctrl+Shift etc.

The bug affects many people, its importance is set to “High”, so we may expect that an official fix will be released soon. You can subscribe to notifications about this bug on launchpad.net, so that you receive an email when it’s done.

Currently, a patch aimed at resolving this issue is being tested. By now it seems to work for most users, though certain problems remain. To install the patch, use the following commands:

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:attente/modifier-only-input-switch sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get upgrade

A system reboot was needed in my case to make it work (simple log out and log in may be sufficient).

Note: Originally, the patch was located at ppa:attente/1218322. If you have previously installed it from there, you can first purge it as follows

sudo ppa-purge ppa:attente/1218322...
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A confirmed bug in Ubuntu 13.10 prevents users from switching layouts using combinations like Alt+Shift, Caps Lock, Ctrl+Shift etc.

The bug affects many people, its importance is set to "High", so we may expect that an official fix will be released soon. You can subscribe to notifications about this bug on launchpad.net, so that you receive an email when it's done.

Currently, a patch aimed at resolving this issue is being tested. By now it seems to work for most users, though certain problems remain. To install the patch, use the following commands:

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:attente/modifier-only-input-switch sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get upgrade

A system reboot was needed in my case to make it work (simple log out and log in may be sufficient).

Note: Originally, the patch was located at ppa:attente/1218322. If you have previously installed it from there, you can first purge it as follows

sudo ppa-purge ppa:attente/1218322

and then execute...

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When you switch a language by using the Language bar, the keyboard layout changes to the keyboard for that language.

Use the Language bar when you:

Want to switch between languages with a Roman alphabet, such as English, Spanish, or French, and a language with a non-Roman alphabet, such as Arabic or Chinese.

Want to switch between languages with a non-Roman alphabet, such as Greek or Russian.

Prefer to use native keyboard layouts when you type in different languages that have a Roman alphabet.

Note: In most cases, after you have enabled the keyboard layout for two or more languages, the Language bar automatically appears in the taskbar or on the desktop. If the Language bar does not automatically appear after you enable a keyboard, see Where is the Language bar?

After you have enabled the keyboard language that you want, open your document and place the cursor in the document where you...

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I solved the problem!

The file 40-Keyboard.conf error. Rule change the layout of groups somehow written in the line:
Option "XkbVariant" "grp:alt_shift_toggle"

Should be as follows:
Option "XkbOptions" "grp:alt_shift_toggle"

Forwards, save, restart X-server. Does not work! Why?
It appears in the directory /etc/X11/xorg.conf.d/ there is another file with the description "XkbOptions". This file 40-evdev.conf with line:
Option "XkbOptions" "terminate:ctrl_alt_bksp"

Since the file 40-evdev.conf read before the file 40-Keyboard.conf, then the values of "XkbOptions" from the second file will not be accepted!

Log out. Remove the line:
Option "XkbOptions" "terminate:ctrl_alt_bksp"

from the file 40-evdev.conf, and a value of "terminate: ctrl_alt_bksp" moved to file 40-Keyboard.conf. Should be:
Option "XkbOptions" "grp:alt_shift_toggle,terminate:ctrl_alt_bksp"

Developers! Please correct...

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“Something’s wrong with your keyboard,” a friend borrowing my laptop would say. “When I type, all that comes out is gibberish!”

“Nothing’s wrong with my keyboard,” I would reply with a grin. “It’s the layout on your keyboard that’s wrong!”

What usually follows is a long lecture on how the Dvorak keyboard layout is better than QWERTY in every way.

My friends usually humor me — this has happened several times — but I’ll spare you the sermon and make it short. Out of the hundreds of reasons you should switch to Dr. Dvorak’s layout, here are seven:

1. QWERTY was designed for the typewriter, not the typist.

Christopher Sholes, who invented the typewriter, found that early prototypes of his invention had a mechanical flaw: When he struck neighboring keys in rapid succession, the typewriter jammed. He needed to replace the initial alphabetical layout with one that separated keys often struck successively. Thus the QWERTY layout was born. This did...

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The so-called QWERTY keyboard layout–the keyboard most of us use every day–is a typing mainstay. Most people will never need or want to use anything else. But, there are other keyboard layouts out there, some of which claim to be more efficient.

QWERTY, as legend has it, was invented with the typewriter by Christopher Sholes in 1868. The QWERTY layout was developed to space out oft-used letters and prevent the keys from getting jammed (as old typewriters were wont to do). And we’ve been using it ever since.

But, that doesn’t mean others haven’t tried to invent something better. Indeed, there are two other oft-tried alternate layouts: Dvorak and Colemak. Dvorak is by far the most popular and routinely mentioned. It is designed to place the most-often used letters on home row, meaning your fingers have to go through fewer motions.

The Dvorak keyboard layout.

The Colemak keyboard, meanwhile, maintains some of the QWERTY layout but does mix things up...

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There are many keyboard layouts and transliteration schemes to Type in Telugu. Many of users who type Telugu on computers use proprietary encodings and keyboard layouts like Modular, Apple, and Roma. If they have a way to type in Telugu in Unicode using the layout they are familiar with, it would boost the usage of Telugu on the Web specifically and on computers generally. This post explores the problem of keyboard layouts and introduces some Keyboard Layout Creators.

Lot of people who work with/write/publish Telugu on computers (ignoring Telugu bloggers and Wikipedians) use applications like Anu Script Manager (Anu Fonts), Shree-Lipi, iLEAP, etc. (Through out this post, I’ll refer to them as ‘these applications’.) These applications are good for printing purposes, but not for producing content for the Web. They are not good because they produce non-Unicode text. Non-Unicode text is bad on the web because–

user must have the font that supports particular...
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