How to successfully restart a network without reboot over SSH?

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There are two big things that matter for programmers: knowing what needs to be done, and doing it. So when a server that you SSH into tells you that it wants to be restarted, it’s nice to just do that quick reboot. So long as you trust that nothing will break (a small but import thing) the process of power cycling a server you only have access to over SSH isn’t too many steps.

If you like, here’s a video explaining how you power cycle a remote server that you’ve connected to via SSH:

Step by Step Guide to Restarting a Remote Server of SSH

And here’s the written form:

Log in to the server via SSH Type sudo reboot That’s basically it.

The video says a bit more. The big thing to know if that if you’re logged in as the “root” — most powerful — user on the system, the sudo is unnecessary. But if you’re instead just a normal user — which is generally recommended as a general security measure — you’ll need it. sudo is a simple command that basically means “for...

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I have a laptop running Ubuntu 14.04, but I'm having WiFi connectivity issues. When I switch on the laptop, it can connect to WiFi with no problems, but after some time that the WiFi was on (connected or disconnected), the WiFi stops working. It shows that it is connected, but the internet connection doesn't work. If I disconnect and try to reconnect, it won't connect again to any WiFi (but Ethernet always works). I've tried to put it on airplane mode, disabling WiFi, killing wifi-manager, using a USB wireless adapter, but nothing short of rebooting works to get the WiFi back up.

I presume that the reason it works is because rebooting causes a specific service or program that is causing the issue to restart.

My question is, does anyone know how I can restart that WiFi connectivity service that is causing the issue without having to restart the whole...

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This video demonstrates how to reboot your server over SSH.

The big thing to know if that if you’re logged in as the “root” — most powerful — user on the system, the sudo is unnecessary.

But if you’re instead just a normal user — which is generally recommended as a general security measure — you’ll need it. sudo is a simple command that basically means “for the stuff I type after this, use an elevate permissions level.”

Or, in other words “as a ‘super-user'”.

Because non-root users don’t typically have the ability to reboot over SSH, you’ll need that to do so. But otherwise that’s all you need.

Another thing to note is that you’ll be disconnected if the command executes successfully. This makes sense. A system that’s powering off to then come back up will inherently drop all of it’s external connection, including the one to you via SSH.

For more advice about using the Unix command line and more, check out this recent article:...

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Step-by-step instructions for setting up an SSH server, a VNC server, and an SSH client in order to VNC securely from one computer to another.

Introduction – RTFM or WTFM.

My new year’s resolution this year was RTFM. When there are (ahem) fine manuals, one can save time by reading them. But in many cases, manuals do not exist, or are not so fine. So I periodically write stuff down (WTFM, as it were) to document stuff. This article provides step-by-step instructions, with lots of screen shots, for setting up an SSH server, a VNC server, and an SSH client in order to VNC securely from one computer to another. All of this can be done with free open-source software.

VNC is a remote-control client/server application that allows a local client computer to connect to a remote server computer over a network. Keyboard and mouse inputs are sent from the local computer to the remote computer, and screen output is sent from the remote computer to the local...

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I sometimes find the Java setup on my various Apple devices to be a mystery.

Recently, I was trying to get a Java applet to run in the same way on 2 iMacs and my MacBook Air. The applet is a simple vpn client from Juniper that lets me access a Citrix Desktop from any Mac that I can install the Citrix receiver client on so I can work on 'Company stuff' from a large screen iMac when I'm sat at home or from my MacBook when I'm on the road (it works fine over 3/4G).

The first thing is that you...

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Hardening Solaris with Jass

Hardening Solaris with Jass

By Seбn Boran
www.boran.com/security/sp/Solaris_hardening4.html

This article presents a concise step-by-step approach to securely installing Solaris for use in a firewall DMZ or other sensitive environment, using Sun's Jass tool (and with Solaris 8 the Sunscreen EFS lite firewall). This article was written (and tested) for Solaris 8, but the techniques described here should work fine on earlier versions too.

The hardening process is divided into the following steps:

Preparation Initial OS installation Install Jass Mounting file systems restrictively in /etc/vfstab Install a local firewall: Sunscreen EFS lite or IPF More hardening: routing, email, resolver, tools Patches RPC Logging, Cron, Permissions Limiting SUID Files Install an Integrity Checker: e.g. Tripwire Install, test, harden applications Going Live

Reference section

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By Sergei Romanenko

October, 2013

This article describes the installation of Oracle Database 12c Release 1 (12.1.0.1 64-bit) RAC on Linux (Oracle Linux 6.4 64-bit) using VirtualBox (4.2.18). Highlights of this installation procedure:

Smallest possible footprint in terms of RAM and disk space without noticeable performance hit; Short and fast way to get RAC installed and running. Only required operations included. If you can find more efficient way, please let me know; Both ASMLib and Udev shared disk configurations are covered; GUI-maximized, it is friendly for beginners, saves time for experienced veterans;

Content

Introduction

This is my second article on Oracle RAC installed in VirtualBox. The first one was about RAC version 11g, which drew very positive feedback from readers. Over last year, I became very active user of VirtualBox, this is quite stable piece of software and I moved many aging physical computers in my household into...

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