How to run 32-bit app in Ubuntu 64-bit?

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In short: exactly the same question as "How to run 32-bit app in Ubuntu 64-bit", but because its answer is no longer working.

Details:

$ bios/extlinux/extlinux bash: bios/extlinux/extlinux: No such file or directory $ file bios/extlinux/extlinux bios/extlinux/extlinux: ELF 32-bit LSB executable, Intel 80386, version 1 (SYSV), dynamically linked, interpreter /lib/ld-linux.so.2, for GNU/Linux 2.6.32, BuildID[sha1]=6b439421a757a6f3a4218c726538be790a22ca13, stripped $ uname -m x86_64 $ lsb_release -a No LSB modules are available. Distributor ID: Ubuntu Description: Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Release: 16.04 Codename: xenial

I.e., under Ubuntu Xenial the previous working answer no longer working:

$ sudo dpkg --add-architecture i386 $ sudo apt-get install libc6:i386 libncurses5:i386 libstdc++6:i386 Reading package lists... Done Building dependency tree Reading state information... Done Package libc6:i386 is not available, but is referred to by another package. This may...
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Most Linux distributions have 64-bit versions for x86_64 processors, such as the AMD Athlon II or the Intel Xeon. Since these distributions maintain their own package repositories, they usually provide binary packages for all of their supported applications. If you are completely content with your out-of-box Linux installation, you may never need to run a 32-bit program.

Some commercial Linux software, particularly games, only provide 32-bit versions. In these rare cases, you will need to configure your 64-bit machine to run 32-bit software.

Install the 32-bit libraries

Because x86_64 processors are designed over x86 technology, they are still able to support 32-bit programs without any hardware emulation, like what you would need to run x86 programs in a PowerPC or Sparc environment. In Linux, all you need to do is install the necessary software libraries to run the 32-bit software. Fortunately, many Linux distributions package these libraries for you....

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I had gone through the steps given below and installed 32 bit application in Ubuntu 64 bit. After the installation I was advised to restart the pc. But system crashed with a message "Graphics not supported". Please help

To run a 32-bit executable file on a 64-bit multi-architecture Ubuntu system, you have to add the i386 architecture and install the three library packages libc6:i386, libncurses5:i386, and libstdc++6:i386:

sudo dpkg --add-architecture i386

Or if you are using Ubuntu 12.04 LTS (Precise Pangolin) or below, use this:

echo "foreign-architecture i386" > /etc/dpkg/dpkg.cfg.d/multiarch

Then:

sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install libc6:i386 libncurses5:i386 libstdc++6:i386

If fails, do also

sudo apt-get install multiarch-support

After these steps, you should be able to run the 32-bit application:

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I installed Ubuntu 14.04 and the current Android development SDK, which contains 32-bit executables. I found that I cannot run those 32-bit binaries. Trying to start them from bash gives me an error:

$ ./adb bash: ./adb: No such file or directory

It is there though:

$ ls -al ./adb -rwxrwxrwx 1 thomas thomas 1231255 Jan 17 13:31 ./adb $ file ./adb ./adb: ELF 32-bit LSB executable, Intel 80386, version 1 (SYSV), dynamically linked (uses shared libs), for GNU/Linux 2.6.8, not stripped. Same symptom for all the other 32-bit tools in the Android SDK.

In olden days one could just install 32-bit libraries on 64-bit Ubuntu to get 32-bit support, but that does not seem to work anymore.

How do I run 32-bit apps on a 64-bit Ubuntu 14.04?

Answers 3

To run a 32-bit executable file on a 64-bit multi-architecture Ubuntu system, you have to add the i386 architecture and install the three library packages libc6:i386, libncurses5:i386, and libstdc++6:i386:

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In this guide I will show you how to create a bootable Zorin OS USB Drive.

To be able to follow this guide you will need the following:

A blank USB drive An internet connection

Zorin OS is a Linux based operating system.

If you are a Windows user you might wonder why you would bother with Zorin OS. If you are a Linux user then you might also wonder why you would use Zorin OS over other distributions such as Linux Mint or Ubuntu.

If you are using an older version of Windows and you can’t afford to upgrade to Windows 10 or your computer doesn’t have the right specifications for running Windows 10 then Zorin OS provides a free (or cheap, depending how much you choose to donate) upgrade path allowing you to continue to use your computer in a much more secure environment.

If your current operating system is Windows XP or Windows Vista then you might consider using Zorin OS Lite as opposed to Zorin OS Core.

The features of Zorin OS Lite are...

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Native support

Since Ubuntu 11.04 and Debian wheezy (7.0), Debian and Ubuntu have multiarch support: you can mix x86_32 (i386) and x86_64 (amd64) packages on the same system in a straightforward way. This is known as multiarch support See warl0ck's answer for more details.

In older releases, Debian and Ubuntu ship with a number of 32-bit libraries on amd64. Install the ia32-libs package to have a basic set of 32-bit libraries, and possibly other packages that depend on this one. Your 32-bit executables should simply run if you have all the required libraries. For development, install gcc-multilib , and again possibly other packages that depend on it such as g++-multilib. You may find binutils-multiarch useful as well, and ia32-libs-dev on Debian. Pass the -m32 option to gcc to compile for ix86.

Note that uname -m will still show x64_64 if you're running a 64-bit kernel, regardless of what 32-bit user mode components you have installed. Schroot described...

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How To Run 32 Bit Software on 64 Bit Ubuntu

Most Linux software packages are designed for 64 bit architectures, especially those, which are dedicated for X_86 architectures. But, running 32-bit apps and games on 64 bit Linux systems becomes necessary sometimes. Many games on Linux and commercial software are designed for 32 bit architectures. In this article, we will tell you how to run a 32 bit software on 64 bit Linux OS.

Unlike high end infrastructures like PowerPC or Sparc Environment, x86_64 processors are designed in a way that can enable them to run the 32 bit systems without the hardware level emulation. This makes it easier for the users who want to run a 32 bit software on 64 bit Linux OS to do the tweak. You just need to install the necessary libraries to get the software ready for running on the machine. In Ubuntu, the libraries are packaged and you can activate them by typing using the following command (ia32-libs) in the...

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As of 2008, most new consumer desktop PCs being sold contain processors from AMD or Intel which are capable of operating in 32-bit and 64-bit modes. List of processors with 64-bit support:

AMD Athlon64, Athlon FX, Athlon X2, Phenom, Semprons that use AM2/AM2+/AM3 socket, Turion64 Intel VIA

In addition to the list above, a number of other architectures also support 64-bit processing (Itanium, S/390, PowerPC, SPARC, MIPS, etc.), but these are not supported by Ubuntu. For support of these architectures, see Debian, on which Ubuntu is based.

Each manufacturer has a different name for 64-bit, such as: AMD's AMD64 and Intel's IA-32e (later EM64T). We use AMD64 to refer to all implementations.

Whilst your processor probably already supports 64-bits, in order to benefit from it you need a 64-bit operating system.

32-bit and 64-bit refer to the size (or width) of a chunk of memory or more accurately, the memory registers in a computer's CPU - this defines how...

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How to Install a 32bit program in 64bit Ubuntu

With Ubuntu 12.04 and 13.10 both recommending 64bit for most users (at last), you may find that some software doesn't have a 64bit counterpart.

Some people would have undoubtedly moaned and groaned about it. However, if you favorite no-name muse doesn't seem to swing that way, there is a solution. Lie. That's right, you can trick applications into thinking you're still a 32bit kinda guy. They might not work perfectly every time, and certainly won't take advantage of your new-found super-speed, but they might just plod along anyway.

Warnings

Some software may not work this way. Some may cause damage that should be easily reversible (no promises). Unfortunately, we can't help every individual case, but you can askubuntu.com about specific pieces of software if this doesn't work.

1. Check

First, check to see if the package you want is available in 64bit. Try googling around, 32bit will have...

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Quick answer

To run 32-bit programs on 64-bit installations of Ubuntu, install the package ia32-libs:

markus@ubuntu:~$ sudo apt-get install ia32-libs

Long story

I wrote this article to expand your knowledge and understanding of how Linux works. This knowledge should increase your problem solving skills and speed in the area of server administration and command line use. I show how I adapted an installation shell script of a commercial software package, Flash® Media Server, which was written for RedHat Linux, to work on 64-bit Ubuntu Linux. For every symptom that occurs in the process, I explain the problem behind it and how to fix it. The end result is available in Installing Flash® Media Server on Ubuntu Linux.

This article is the first part in a series on the subject. In it I write about running 32 bit programs on 64 bit operating systems and the concept of shared libraries.

The exact versions of the software used in the course are Ubuntu 8.04...

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I'm sorry to say that an upgrade from 32-bit to 64-bit Ubuntu operating system is very difficult to accomplish successfully. A manual migration would be a much simpler way of moving to 64-bit.

If you attempted to upgrade the system manually (as there is no way to do it automatically), it would first have to uninstall every package on the system with all dependencies, and this would include your kernel, grub and pretty much everything else on the system. The chances of having everything reinstalled exactly the way you had it before in 32-bit mode are very remote, and you might even find that some things get corrupted or deleted on the way.

Your only path in this situation would be to back up your /home directories, your /etc directory, anything in your /usr/local directories and all other files and directories you want to keep. You might want to check out etckeeper (find our more: etckeeper) for a good way to back up your /etc directory to a source control repository...

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Brief: This quick tip shows you to check if Ubuntu is 32 bit or 64 bit. You can also check if your system can support 64-bit or not.

Do I have a 32-bit system or 64-bit system? How to tell if my computer is 32-bit or 64-bit? How to find out if my system is 64 bit capable or not? Am I running 32-bit Ubuntu or a 64-bit Ubuntu? Am I running 32-bit Ubuntu on a 64-bit CPU?

These are some of the common questions that a user often wonders about. Finding out if a computer is 32 bit or 64 bit is fairly simple. Before we see how to tell if Ubuntu is 32 bit or 64 bit, first let’s see the difference between the two systems.

32 bit vs 64-bit system

Processors in the early 1990’s used 32-bit architecture. This means that their data bus had the capacity to handle 32 bit at a time. As the technology grew, 64-bit processors came into the scene.

These newer processors have a data bus width of 64 bit. This means they are at least twice as fast to their...

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I'm trying to compile a 32-bit C application on Ubuntu Server 12.04 LTS 64-bit using gcc 4.8. I'm getting linker error messages about incompatible libraries and skipping -lgcc. What do I need to do to get 32 bit apps compiled and linked?

Ubuntu 14.04

sudo apt-get install gcc-multilib

For some reason, on Ubuntu 17.04, I also needed to install the version specific one:

sudo apt-get install gcc-6-multilib

Then a minimal hello world:

#include int main() { puts("Hello world!"); return 0; }

compiles without warning under:

gcc -m32 -pedantic-errors -std=c89 -Wall hello_world.c

and:

./a.out

gives: Hello world! as expected, and:

file a.out

says:

a.out: ELF 32-bit LSB executable, Intel 80386, version 1 (SYSV), dynamically linked (uses shared libs), for GNU/Linux 2.6.24, BuildID[sha1]=87c87a83878ce7e7d23b6236e4286bf1daf59033, not stripped

and:

qemu-i386 a.out

also gives: Hello world! but would fail for an x86_64...

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I installed Ubuntu 14.04 and the current Android development SDK, which contains 32-bit executables. I found that I cannot run those 32-bit binaries. Trying to start them from bash gives me an error:

thomas@thinkpad$ ./adb bash: ./adb: No such file or directory

It is there though:

thomas@thinkpad$ ls -al ./adb -rwxrwxrwx 1 thomas thomas 1231255 Jan 17 13:31 ./adb thomas@thinkpad$ file ./adb ./adb: ELF 32-bit LSB executable, Intel 80386, version 1 (SYSV), dynamically linked (uses shared libs), for GNU/Linux 2.6.8, not stripped. Same symptom for all the other 32-bit tools in the Android SDK.

In olden days one could just install 32-bit libraries on 64-bit Ubuntu to get 32-bit support, but that does not seem to work anymore.

How do I run 32-bit apps on a 64-bit Ubuntu...

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