How to list all variables names and their current values?

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Enter the following command in a terminal to print all the environment variables:

printenv

For further information about this command, read the printenv man page.

To show a list including the variables created by yourself you can enter the next command:

( set -o posix ; set ) | less

This will show you not only your variables, but the environment var too.

For more information related with this topic read:

I know that this question is quite old and answered, but I think I can add a bit of useful information.

In all the methods described above, the procedure that is suggested is:

lauch a terminal show the environment variables using env, or printenv or whatever

The problem of these solutions are that you are seeing the environment variables of the shell that is running into the terminal. You are not seeing the environment variables available to an application run, for example, directly by the graphic interface.

This is...

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hi Everyone,

Do you know how to list all the class module variables along with their "current" values during run-time?

This is similar to lookup the variables on the watch panel during run-time, but I am trying to list all of them to a worksheet using VBA.

Maybe I am not using a good enough keyword, but the best I can find on the internet is List of variables in a Module
But Zack Barresse's solution is just to list all the variables defined in the module, not to list their values during run-time (Please correct me if I am wrong).

The reason that I am doing this:
I have around 20-30 public variables sitting in some class modules. Differnt subs/functions would change those variables. I want to see what values those variable have at different stages, so I wrote a "status" sub to print out the variable names and their value, and call this "status" sub in other subs/functions. However, this is not the ideal way to do as I have to hard code all the...

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Environment variables in an operating system are values that contain information about the system environment, and the currently logged in user. They existed in OSes before Windows as well, such as MS-DOS. Applications or services can use the information defined by environment variables to determine various things about the OS, for example, to detect the number of processes, the currently logged in user's name, the folder path to the current user's profile or the temporary files directory. In this article, we will see how to view environment variables defined on your system and their values for the current user, for specific processes and the system variables.

Windows has several types of environment variables: user variables, system variables, process variables and volatile variables. User environment variables are accessible to all apps which run in the current user context, system environment variables apply to all users and processes on the PC; process variables...

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H

ow do I display all my environment variables using bash shell on RHEL / Debian / Ubuntu / CentOS / Fedora / Mint Linux operating systems?


You can use any one of the following command to display the environment variables and their values.

a) printenv command – Print all or part of environment.

b) env command – Print all exported environment or run a program in a modified environment.

c) set command – Print the name and value of each shell variable.

Examples

I recommend that you use the printenv command:

OR

OR

Sample outputs:

Fig.01: Command to see a list of all currently defined environment variables in a Linux bash terminal

A list of the commonly used variables in Linux

set and env command

You can use the env / set command too:

Sample outputs:

HOME=/home/vivek vivek@nas01:~$ env TERM=xterm-256color SHELL=/bin/bash...
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On the File menu, point to New, and then click Workflow.

On the first page of the Workflow Designer, name the workflow, select Maps in the list, and then select the check boxes that indicate that the workflow should start whenever an item is created and updated.

Click Next.

In the Step Name box, enter a meaningful name for the step such as Store URL.

Click Actions, and then click Build Dynamic String.

Note: If the action does not appear in the list, click More Actions to see the list of all actions.

Build the URL string and store it in a variable

The next step is to build the URL string that will display the link to the map on Live Search Maps.

Click Actions, and then click Build Dynamic String.

If this action does not appear in the list, click More Actions to see the full list.

In the action, click dynamic...

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This article from 2004 was on OTN for many years. It wasn't flagged for saving when they did an infrastructure migration in 2010 but I think it still has some value because SQL*Plus is fundamentally unchanged. Ignore the reference manual links, which don't point to the current manual. Also ignore the section on iSQL*Plus, a product obsoleted by the introduction of Oracle Apex and SQL Developer.

Contents

1 Introduction 2 Using Substitution Variables 2.1 Creating, Showing and Deleting Substitution Variables 2.2 Referencing Substitution Variables 2.3 Prompting for Undefined Variables 2.4 Difference Between "&" and "&&" Prefixes 2.5 Storing a Query Column Value in a Substitution Variable 2.6 Predefined Substitution Variables 2.7 Script Parameters 2.8 More on Substitution Variables 3 Using Bind Variables 3.1 Assigning Substitution Variables to Bind Variables 3.2 Assigning Bind Variables to Substitution Variables 4 Using System Variables 4.1 System...
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Allright, thanks for your answers! In the end, the perfect conclusion for me is using the Type class, which serves functions for exactly what I want to achieve.

This function gives me all the Properties according to the Type that I pass to it using "myObject.GetType()":

public static Variable[] getProperties(Type type) { var propertyValues = type.GetProperties (); var result = new Variable[propertyValues.Length]; for (int i = 0; i < propertyValues.Length; i++) { result[i].name = propertyValues[i].Name; result[i].type = propertyValues[i].GetType(); } return result; }

And I use these Functions to read or write a values:

public object getValue(string name) { return this.GetType().GetProperty(name).GetValue(this,null); } public void setValue(string name, object value) { this.GetType().GetProperty(name).SetValue(this,value,null); }

In my case I need the...

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Variables and Expressions

Table of Contents

Variables

Variable types: AutoHotkey has no explicitly defined variable types. However, a variable containing only digits (with an optional decimal point) is automatically interpreted as a number when a math operation or comparison requires it. (To improve performance, numbers are cached internally to avoid conversions to/from strings.)

Variable scope and declarations: With the exception of local variables in functions, all variables are global; that is, their contents may be read or altered by any part of the script. Except where noted on the functions page, variables do not need to be declared; they come into existence simply by using them (and each variable starts off empty/blank).

Variable names: Variable names are not case sensitive (for example, CurrentDate is the same as currentdate). Variable names may be up to 253 characters long and may consist of letters, numbers and the following punctuation: #...

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The "Set Variable Value" action is available in the Case Editor for when you want to set a variable's value as part of an interaction.

When configuring the "Set Variable Value" action you can either choose from a list of variables already in your file or you can click "Add Variable" to be taken to the Global Variables dialog.

In the dropdown at the bottom of the right-hand column of the Case Editor, choose what your target variable's value will be set to. Choose from the following options:

Value: A value you manually enter or that you define with an expression, by clicking the "fx" button.

Value of variable: The value stored in another variable. Choose from the list of variables or add a new one.

Length of variable value: The length (in number of characters) of another variable value. Choose from the list of variables or add a new one.

Text on widget: The text on a widget, or the text entered into a text field or text area. Choose a target...

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GNU make: Using Variables

6 How to Use Variables

A variable is a name defined in a makefile to represent a string of text, called the variable’s value. These values are substituted by explicit request into targets, prerequisites, recipes, and other parts of the makefile. (In some other versions of make, variables are called macros.)

Variables and functions in all parts of a makefile are expanded when read, except for in recipes, the right-hand sides of variable definitions using ‘=’, and the bodies of variable definitions using the define directive.

Variables can represent lists of file names, options to pass to compilers, programs to run, directories to look in for source files, directories to write output in, or anything else you can imagine.

A variable name may be any sequence of characters not containing ‘:’, ‘#’, ‘=’, or whitespace. However, variable names containing characters other than letters, numbers, and underscores should be considered...

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Environment variables provide a way to influence the behaviour of software on the system. For example, the "LANG" environment variable determines the language in which software programs communicate with the user.

Environment variables consist of names that have values assigned to them. For example, on a typical system in the US we would have the value "en_US.UTF-8" assigned to the "LANG" variable.

The meaning of an environment variable and the format of its value are determined by the application using it. There are quite a few well-known environment variables for which the meaning and the format have been agreed upon and they are used by many applications.

While quite a few graphical system configuration applications actually manipulate environment variables in the background, the command-line allows for maximum flexibility when manipulating environment variables.

Note: The shell techniques explained in the following sections apply to the Bourne...

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I know that this question is quite old and answered, but I think I can add a bit of useful information.

In all the methods described above, the procedure that is suggested is:

lauch a terminal show the environment variables using env, or printenv or whatever

The problem of these solutions are that you are seeing the environment variables of the shell that is running into the terminal. You are not seeing the environment variables available to an application run, for example, directly by the graphic interface.

This is noticeable if, for example, you use your ~/.profile, or .bashrc, or .zshenv (depending on your shell) to modify the environment variables --- like the classic addition of directories to the path.

To see the environment variables available to the application started directly in the graphic environment, you can do the following (in Gnome Shell, I am sure there is an equivalent method in all the other DE):

press Alt-F2 run the command...
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