How to create a meta-package that automatically installs other packages?

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A meta-package like this can be created with a tool called equivs which will create a package with just dependency information.

First, create a directory:

mkdir my-metapackage cd my-metapackage/

Now run the program:

equivs-control ns-control

It will create a file called ns-control, open this file with your text editor. The control file that you generate should have its Depends or Recommends lines modified to depend on the packages that you want installed:

Section: misc Priority: optional Standards-Version: 3.9.1 Package: my-metapackage Version: 1.0 Depends: openssh-server, gedit Description: This package installes an ssh server and a text editor The Long description of this package ends with a newline!

(Just an example, you should include more information)

And finally, build the package by running

equivs-build ns-control

Your package is located at my-metapackage/my-metapackage_1.0_all.deb.

If you wish to also create a source...

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I'd like to be able to create a package that doesnt contain any code or programs itself, but instead installs other packages that exist in the repositories onto a computer, sort of how the ubuntu-restricted-extras package does?

A meta-package like this can be created with a tool called equivs which will create a package with just dependency information.

First, create a directory:

mkdir my-metapackage cd my-metapackage/

Now run the program:

equivs-control ns-control

It will create a file called ns-control, open this file with your text editor. The control file that you generate should have its Depends or Recommends lines modified to depend on the packages that you want installed:

Section: misc Priority: optional Standards-Version: 3.9.1 Package: my-metapackage Version: 1.0 Depends: openssh-server, gedit Description: This package installes an ssh server and a text editor The Long description of this package ends with a newline!

(Just an...

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This article aims to assist users creating their own packages using the Arch Linux "ports-like" build system, also for submission in AUR. It covers creation of a PKGBUILD – a package build description file sourced by makepkg to create a binary package from source. If already in possession of a PKGBUILD, see makepkg. For instructions regarding existing rules and ways to improve package quality see Arch packaging standards.

Overview

Packages in Arch Linux are built using the makepkg utility and the information stored in a PKGBUILD file. When makepkg runs, it searches for a PKGBUILD in the current directory and follows the instructions in it to acquire the required files and/or compile them to be packed within a package file (pkgname.pkg.tar.xz). The resulting package contains binary files and installation instructions ready to be installed by pacman.

An Arch package is no more than a tar archive, or 'tarball', compressed using xz, which contains the following...

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On current Debian versions, you can get a list of explicitly-installed packages with

apt-mark showmanual

For those running ancient versions of Debian where apt-mark showmanual doesn't exist, or if you want to perform additional selections, you can use aptitude.

aptitude search '~i !~M' -F %p >package.list

~i matches installed packages; !~M omits the packages that were installed automatically as a dependency of some other package. -F %p changes the output format to include only the package name.

You can later install those packages with

apt-get install $(cat package.list)

Debian squeeze doesn't have apt-mark showmanual, but it has apt-mark showauto which lists automatically-installed packages. If you use this, you can list all packages on the old system with dpkg --get-selections >package.list, restore all of these, and then mark the automatic packages with apt-mark markauto. For your use case (32-bit to 64-bit), this approach is likely to leave a few...

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Using Meta Packages to Install Groups of Packages

Meta packages are "empty" packages, that either require or obsolete other packages or provide programs or files to fix broken dependencies. For example one of the Lineox Application Server packages requires "//usr/bin/perl" (note the double slash) and to fix that, Lineox has updated the meta package used to fix older dependency problems. Meta packages are an easy solution to install a large number of packages that are related, but do not have inter-dependencies that would draw the others, if one of them is installed.

Note: Initially we called these virtual packages, but in Debian speak the term meta package has already been established. We are sorry, but we are not Debian experts. :-)

Pros and cons of meta packages

Meta packages are handy if you use apt-get, synaptic, or yum as your package manager. Because Lineox has apt-get and synaptic as preferred package managers, we assume that you already are...
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There is an alternative way to upload and install packages to your instance. In your file system, you have a crx-quicksart folder alongside with your jar and license.properties file. You need to create a folder named install under crx-quickstart. You will then have something like this: /crx-quickstart/install

In this install, folder, you can add directly your packages. They will automatically be uploaded and installed on your instance. When it's done, you can see the packages in the Package Manager.

If your instance is running, adding a package to the install folder will launch directly the upload and the installation on the instance. If your instance is not running, the packages you put in the install folder will be installed at startup in the alphabetical...

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19 minutes to read Contributors

No matter what your package does or what code it contains, you use nuget.exe to package that functionality into a component that can be shared with and used by any number of other developers. To install nuget.exe, see Install NuGet CLI. Note that Visual Studio does not automatically include nuget.exe.

Technically speaking, a NuGet package is just a ZIP file that's been renamed with the .nupkg extension and whose contents match certain conventions. This topic describes the detailed process of creating a package that meets those conventions. For a focused walkthrough, refer to Quickstart: create and publish a package.

Packaging begins with the compiled code (assemblies), symbols, and/or other files that you want to deliver as a package (see Overview and workflow). This process is independent from compiling or otherwise generating the files that go into the package, although you can use draw from information...

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Automatic packaging is a process that package maintainers can run on their own to keep the packages they maintain up to date. It is not a required step for maintaining packages on the community feed (https://chocolatey.org/packages), but it is recommended you find a way to automate the delivery of packages to the community feed when there are updates if you are going to maintain more than 5 packages and you are not the software vendor for the packages you maintain.

NOTE: Not to be confused with the automatic package creation feature in Chocolatey for Business - that feature creates packages directly from software installer files. This feature is for package maintenance of existing packages on the community feed.

There are currently two methods that can be used to maintain automatic packages:

You can learn more about the AU updater via its documentation. It is a PowerShell module, so you are doing everything with PowerShell scripts. You can also run everything...

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In the Symantec Endpoint Protection Manager (SEPM), how do you create and configure a custom installation package for Windows for Symantec Endpoint Protection (SEP)?

Note: Client Install Settings and Client Install Feature Set configurations only apply to Windows install packages. You can export a Macintosh or Linux install package through Admin > Install Packages > Client Install Package, but the configuration options differ.

To create a new custom client installation settings configuration

Note: Some options may not appear in older versions of the management console. This procedure applies to 12.1.6 or later.

In Symantec Endpoint Protection Manager (SEPM), click Admin > Install Packages > Client Install Settings. Under Tasks, click Add Client Install Settings. Enter the name and the description for the custom Client Install Settings. Specify these and other options in the Basic Settings tab: An installation type The installation...
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The first step in building an install package for your app is to define all the components of the package. These components include basic package information, the terms for using your app, the Oracle Cloud services required, and the actions required to install, uninstall, and upgrade the app.

To define the package:

Sign in to Oracle Cloud Marketplace Partner Portal. Click Listings.

If you haven’t started a listing, click Create Listing. Enter information into the required fields in the header and then click Save. You must complete this step before you can continue to define the install package.

If you already started a listing, find the listing on the Started tab, and then click Edit.

Click the App Install Package tab.

To create a new install package, click Create Package, enter the basic information for the install package, and then click...

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I ran into a problem that nothing happened after adding (package-install 'org) into .emacs. I wanted to install the up-to-date version of org-mode and the built-in org-mode is quite old.

I dug out the source code of package-install from Emacs 25.3.1. The function self already checks if a package is installed or not and refuses to install it if the package is already installed. So the check (unless (package-installed-p package) ...) from answer 10093312 is in fact uncalled for.

(defun package-install (pkg &optional dont-select) "Install the package PKG. PKG can be a package-desc or a symbol naming one of the available packages in an archive in `package-archives'. Interactively, prompt for its name. If called interactively or if DONT-SELECT nil, add PKG to `package-selected-packages'. If PKG is a package-desc and it is already installed, don't try to install it but still mark it as selected." (interactive (progn ;; Initialize the package system to get the list of...
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The install command is used to install packages and accepts a list of package names to install as arguments. Unlike upgrade, the install command will only install new packages.

Install recognizes several different ways of specifying a package:

Abstract Packages are documented here.

By default, required package dependencies are also installed. To also automatically install optional dependencies (not dependency groups, but dependencies specified using the tag in package.xml), pass the -o or --optionaldeps option to the install command:

php pyrus.phar install -o PackageName

Plugins (documented here) must be explicitly installed with the -p or --plugin option. Plugins are installed into the location specified by the plugins_dir configuration variable, which defaults to the same location that the user configuration file is located ($HOME/.pear in unix, \pear on windows).

php pyrus.phar install -p PEAR2_Pyrus_Developer

Developers...

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One of the handy features of apt (the packaging system used by Ubuntu) is the use of metapackages. These packages do not contain actual software, they simply depend on other packages to be installed. This setup allows entire sets of software to be installed by selecting only the appropriate metapackage. For example, an Ubuntu user can install the Kubuntu environment (KDE and all its associated programs) by selecting "kubuntu-desktop."

Desktop Metapackages

gnome-desktop-environment: This installs the GNOME Desktop environment, a graphical interface to use on your Debian system. It includes a wide range of applications, including programs for email, messaging, word processing, financial accounting, conferencing, and more.

kde: This metapackage includes all the official modules released with KDE that are not specific to development. In addition to the core KDE modules, this includes multimedia, networking, personal information manager (PIM), graphics,...

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RHEL 7/CentOS 7

Install CUDA using the following command:

$ sudo yum install cuda-toolkit-9-1 \ xorg-x11-drv-nvidia-libs nvidia-kmod

If the system is using a non-NVIDIA GPU to render the display, remove the files at /etc/X11/xorg.conf and /usr/lib64/nvidia/xorg/libglx.so, and remove the nomodeset kernel parameter from the boot command-line.

Follow the instructions here to ensure that Nouveau is disabled.

RHEL 6/CentOS 6

Install CUDA using the following command:

$ sudo yum install cuda-toolkit-9-1 \ xorg-x11-drv-nvidia-libs nvidia-kmod

If the system is using a non-NVIDIA GPU to render the display, remove the file at /etc/X11/xorg.conf.

Follow the instructions here to ensure that Nouveau is disabled.

Fedora

Install CUDA using the following command:

$ sudo dnf install cuda-toolkit-9-1 \ ...
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