How to automount NTFS partitions?

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The most straight forward way that will work on most Linux systems is to add them to your fstab. But there are others. Each has there own headline in this answer.

Note:

If you get an error massage saying something about "root" or "permissions" it is because for most mounting options you will need root privileges. In unity you can achieve that by prepending gksudo (graphical applications) or sudo to the usual command and typing your password. So, e.g. in case of ntfs-config you press Alt+F2 and type gksudo ntfs-config.

Gigolo

Gigolo

Gigolo is self-explanatory. It works hand in hand with nautilus' remote file system and mounting capabilities. You need to add the partitions to your nautilus bookmarks (nautilus is ubuntu's default file manager). After that you will find them in Gigolo. The rest is said another post of mine.

Fstab

Edit: Since guessing from your comments you are not that acquainted with linux I will explain the...

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There are a great number of Linux users who dual boot their computer with Windows. And in situation like this, one has to make different partitions to separate Windows and Linux partition. Windows usually (not always) uses NTFS file format while Linux is usually (again, not always) installed in Ext3 or Ext4 file format. While using Linux, one has to manually mount the drives. It doesn’t take time in mounting but in some situation you might prefer to have it automatically mounted at each start-up for e.g., if your Music files are on the NTFS partition and you want to use the same directory in Linux it is advisable to auto mount that drive. In this tutorial I will show you the easiest way to mount Windows NTFS partition at each start-up.

One way to automount NTFS drive is by editing fstab, but that might not be simple for beginner Linux users. An alternative way is to use a GUI tool named ntfs-config.

Open the terminal ( Ctrl+Alt+T ) and use the following command to...

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by

Binarylife

Last Updated December 16, 2015 10:01 AM

I have two NTFS partitions, and I don't want to mount them everytime I start Ubuntu.

How can I do this? Is there a tool or a code to use? If so, is it safe to automount? specially when they are being used by another OS?

Answers 8

The most straight forward way that will work on most Linux systems is to add them to your fstab. But there are others. Each has there own headline in this answer.

Note:

If you get an error massage saying something about "root" or "permissions" it is because for most mounting options you will need root privileges. In unity you can achieve that by prepending gksudo (graphical applications) or sudo to the usual command and typing your password. So, e.g. in case of ntfs-config you press Alt+F2 and type gksudo ntfs-config.

Gigolo

Gigolo

Gigolo is self-explanatory. It works hand in hand with nautilus' remote file system and mounting...

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Under normal circumstances, the unmounted status of NTFS drives/partitions does not make much of a difference to the end user. A simple double-click will mount and open the drives. But with the advent of Unity and Dash search, the matter has acquired a new dimension now. Recently used files (and apps) are featured prominently and without the automounting of all drives and partitions, this feature is good as useless.



Automounting NTFS partitions in Ubuntu 12.04, 13.04, 13.10

As we clearly demonstrated earlier, automounting partitions on startup has its benefits, especially in the context of Unity desktop. Unity files lense somehow does not feel complete without all your file usage data, especially if you're not using Home partition for storing huge amounts of data. Now, lets get into the details. Here's a detailed guide on automounting NTFS partitions/drives in Ubuntu on startup (tested on Ubuntu 12.04 and above).


First, you have to figure out the...
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I have two NTFS partitions, and I don't want to mount them everytime I start Ubuntu.

How can I do this? Is there a tool or a code to use? If so, is it safe to automount? specially when they are being used by another OS?

The most straight forward way that will work on most Linux systems is to add them to your fstab. But there are others. Each has there own headline in this answer.

Note:

If you get an error massage saying something about "root" or "permissions" it is because for most mounting options you will need root privileges. In unity you can achieve that by prepending gksudo (graphical applications) or sudo to the usual command and typing your password. So, e.g. in case of ntfs-config you press Alt+F2 and type gksudo ntfs-config.

Gigolo

Gigolo

Gigolo is self-explanatory. It works hand in hand with nautilus' remote file system and mounting capabilities. You need to add the partitions to your nautilus bookmarks (nautilus is ubuntu's...

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Easy way to make NTFS patition automount on Linux -

There are of Linux users who dualboot their computers with Windows. Windows usually but not always uses NTFS file format. While we choose Linux as our operating system has to manually mount the drives.


This situation ( to mount ) doesn't take long time but in some situation you prefer to make it automatically mounted when start-up. So this post will tell guide you to do that. Let's start! Check your hard drive partition to look which NTFS partition that we will add to auto-mount. Type and run this command :

# sudo fdisk -l Disk /dev/sda: 250.1 GB, 250059350016 bytes 255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 30401 cylinders Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes Sector size (logical/physical): 512 bytes / 512 bytes I/O size (minimum/optimal): 512 bytes / 512 bytes Disk identifier: 0x0002850f Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System /dev/sda1 1 7649 61438977 5 Extended /dev/sda2 * 7650 30401...
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This is more for my own notes than anything else, but to properly mount NTFS or vfat (i.e. FAT16/FAT32) partitions in Linux, first find the UUID of the drive using:

For example:

To mount NTFS or vfat partitions properly, you need to specify dmask (directory mask) and fmask (file mask) values, which as you might expect are the MASKS of the values you want to use (i.e. the octal compliments). Yeah, I’m not sure why it’s done this way either, but to calculate the mask value just subtract the value you want from 7.

As long as you know the following you should be just fine:

Read is 4, Write is 2, and Execute is 1.

For example:

If you want to mount the drive with 777 permissions (owner, group and other all r+w+x), then the mask of that is 000 – i.e. 7-7 = 0 for read, write and execute If you want to mount the drive with 751 permissions (owner r+w+x, group r+x, other x), then the mask is 026 – i.e. 7 – 7 = 0, 7 – 5 = 2, 7 – 1 = 6)

So once you’ve...

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Want to automatically mount Windows NTFS partitions in Ubuntu? Well, this brief tutorial is going to show you how. Now Ubuntu comes with support for NTFS partitions right out of the box. No need to install third party tools to make this work as you would previously. It can be partitions on internal / external IDE, SCSI drives, or thumb USB drives. Wherever the partition lives, you should be able to auto mount it in Ubuntu. This will allow you access to data on the drive from Ubuntu without re-partitioning it.

Objectives:

Automatically Mount Windows NTFS Partitions in Ubuntu 12.04 Enjoy!

To get started, press Ctrl – Alt – T on your keyboard to open Terminal. When terminal opens, run the commands below to view all partitions on your system. At this point, the drive should already be attached to your Ubuntu machine.

sudo blkid

Enhance your coding experience with this split keyboard that offers up to 9" of separation.

Next, take note of the...

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Updated: November 20, 2008

If you are dual-booting or multi-booting Windows with one or more Linux distributions, you must have across the following situation: your Linux distribution can read and write to the Windows partitions (NTFS, most likely), but they are not mounted automatically when Linux boots. You must mount them manually, every time ...

But you would like to have the partitions mounted automatically.

Luckily, there is a number of very easy solutions for your situation:

Edit the configuration file for all mount points (/etc/fstab) and add the missing drives. Install the ntfs-config utility and let it do all the hard work for you.

This tutorial is about the second option. Here, we will demonstrate how you to install, configure and use the ntfs-config utility. We will demonstrate using Xubuntu, a Ubuntu distribution running the Xfce desktop.

Install ntfs-config

...

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Thanks for the replies.

Fred, as I said below, that doesn't work. The post you linked to was one of the first ones I tried. Here's what you suggested in that post:

/dev/sdc1 /home/fred/Windows ntfs defaults,umask=007,gid=46 0 0

As I posted below, I already tried that and it does not work. Here's what I tried:


UUID=9E60146539142415 /media/Disk1XP ntfs defaults,umask=007,gid=46 0 0

Other than the UUID and the path, how is that any different than what you suggested in your post? Am I missing something? Do you see something in the one I used that would cause these permission errors? As I said below, I even tried "unmask=000", which is even looser on permissions, right? Isn't the line that's failing for me almost identical to the one you suggested in your earlier post? Am I failing to see something?

Dataman, thanks. I tried that and get permission refusals.

Varaonaid, thanks for the link. I tried that and I still get...

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There are broadly two aproaches -

Per-user mounting does not require root access, it's just automating the desktop interface. Systemwide mounts (/etc/fstab) can allow access from before login, and are therefore much more suitable for access through a network, or by system services.

Commands should be entered on a terminal (Type terminal in the program launcher of recent unity based Ubuntu releases, or select Applications -> Accessories -> Terminal from the menus on older releases).

udisks

This is the modern replacement for gnome-mount. It's not gnome specific.

When you mount a disc normally with the file browser (nautilus etc) it mounts disks by interacting with udisks behind the scenes.

You can do the same thing on the command line with the udisks tool. For example:

/usr/bin/udisks --mount /dev/sdb1

The bit after --mount is the device name of the partition you want to mount. (/dev/something). The command will mount /dev/sdb1...

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Okay! I understand now. The # signs in my fstab file were in fact commenting out the code like I thought it was (I wasn't sure, I thought it might indicate a new line). So I put in the information that I should have and that made the partition disappear completely (not showing up under "Places").

What I didn't realize that I had to do was that I had to make the directory in /media.

So, what you need to do is that you need to edit fstab

Code:

sudo gedit /etc/fstab(Run this in terminal).

and tell it what partition to mount, where it's going to mount it, and the filesystem it's using (ext3, ntfs, fat32, etc).

For example:

Code:

# /etc/fstab: static file system information. # # proc /proc proc defaults 0 0 /dev/sda1 /media/XP ntfs-3g defaults 0 0(To find info on your partition, just go into terminal and type sudo blkid. You also want to use ntfs-3g for the type instead of just ntfs to be able to both read...
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Auto Mount NTFS Partitions at startup on Ubuntu Linux.

Lets suppose You have 2 NTFS partition in windows C Drive and D Drive.

If you want ubuntu to auto mount these drives when you start ubuntu then do the following.

First create the folders c_drive, d_drive in your root.

sudo mkdir /c_drive sudo mkdir /d_drive

Open application called Disks.

Select your hard disk.

Select your ntfs partitions (Volumes) and one by one and note down the device name of all. Lets suppose your C Drive partition is 96 GB. Then select the label that is labeled as (File System Partition … 96 GB NTFS). When you click on it, it will display some information related to your partition (volume). Note down the device name in front of label ‘Device’ (like /dev/sda2). This is path of your C Drive that Ubuntu has specified. Note down the path.

Similarly find the path for the other drive (D Drive).

Now open the file /etc/rc.local in a text...

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Actually all Sabayon Linux Distros from 3.4+ use SATA imaging. Which means that all drives appear as sd*. An example is /dev/sda/

Element

22:34, 24 September 2007 (UTC)`

This will show you how to automount your root Window's parition so that you can read and write to it.

Perform the following commands to create a mountpoint and open up fstab to edit

$ su # mkdir /mnt/Windows # nano -w /etc/fstab


Assuming That Windows is installed on the first Harddisc, and first Partition:

add the following to the bottom:

/dev/sda1 /mnt/Windows ntfs-3g defaults 0 0

The spaces are important they are in columns.

/mnt/Windows is our new mountpoint (where you go to see the files after boot time). ntfs-3g is telling it is a ntfs parition and is needed to write to it. The rest just mounts it automatically and for all users to read and write to it.


If you have a mutliple user system and only want certain users to read/write to it, do...

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I have a multiboot laptop with EFI and GPTs. One drive is a shared drive formatted with NTFS.

I was going to automount it at boot by modifying bits in /etc/fstab. However:

# # / was on /dev/sda10 during installation UUID=e9a74962-203b-4616-9d87-a4ef6bd6bbd3 / ext4 errors=remount-ro 0 1 # /boot/efi was on /dev/sda2 during installation UUID=C2C9-8440 /boot/efi vfat defaults 0 1 # swap was on /dev/sda5 during installation UUID=f3fa0a1b-174f-4459-80af-f1710947ab33 none swap sw 0 0 /dev/sr0 /media/cdrom0 udf,iso9660 user,noauto 0 0

This system has 4 OS'es on different partitions in addition to the DVD and shared partition. So things don't look quite right to me.

How does one go about automounting a shared NTFS drive on an EFI/GPT...

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How to automount ntfs partitions in Arch linux.avi

How to automatically mount ntfs partitions in LinuxHow to mount windows ntfs discs in LinuxHow to Auto Mount a Hard Drive in LinuxAutomount NTFS drives in UBUNTULinux: NTFS file system permissionsHow to install from AUR [Arch Linux]How-To: Mount an External Device on Startup in LinuxManually mounting flash/USB drives for beginnersAutomatically mount Samba shares on startup - LinuxMethod 2: How to Auto Mount a Hard Drive in LinuxMy Arch Linux + Gnome 3.4.2Easy way to Mount Partition Automatically on Start Up in Ubuntu 13.04 Raring RingtailSetting up automount with and without systemd (RHCSA and RHCE)Arch linux - Compiz standalone - tint2RedHat: answer to question 21 (Automounter Configuration, autofs)Setting up File Sharing Between Windows, Linux, and Macs with Samba!Getting Started With Arch Linux 07 - Installing XFCEAutofs - Basic ConfigurationMy Arch Linux desktop with XMonadHow to Auto-Mount a Volume by editing FSTAB (File...
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Having switch from Windows into Linux sometimes give an headache about how to manage your hard-drive, it’s okay, because it’s also happen to me. As you know, Linux prefer EXT4 extension and Windows have NTFS . This won’t be a big problem if Linux was your main and solely operating system, but for you who have Linux and Windows on your machine it will be troublesome.

You can’t abandon your NTFS extensions since Windows can’t read EXT4 extensions, but when you booting on your Linux you need to mount your NTFS drive before you can access it. Actually, is not big problem since almost every Desktop Environment (DE) already support to mount your hard-drive easily. Now let’s see how is actually mounting a hard-drive work in Linux environment.

Manual Mount Hard-Drive

You could manually mount your hard-drive, of course using command line interface (CLI), with help of ntfs-3g package which is fortunately already shipped on...

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Import/Export files and folders from/to Ext partitions

If a hard disk is taken from NAS storage and you need to open a Linux partition and copy from it or place a new file there, Paragon ExtFS for Windows Pro eliminates the need of installing the hard drive or configure it for network access. Simply connect a hard drive via a eSATA connector or USB-to-SATA adapter to the PC and access your files.

Open documents and multimedia directly from Ext2 / Ext3 / Ext4 partitions

If you want to watch movies or open large documents contained on a Linux partition, simply connect the drive directly to the PC to get instant access.

Dual boot environment

If you are working on a dual boot PC with both, Linux and Windows installed, the Paragon driver will grant you access to any ExtFS volume under...

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[Tutorial] Understanding Partitioning and Formatting

A tutorial about partitioning and formatting for beginners.

By Nadim Issa

Data storage:
Data storage is always an important aspect of computing. There are some essentials that need to be addressed when determining how you want to manage this. Some things to keep in mind are: how you like to organize things, what is important to your task at hand, and how much space is needed. I will give a brief overview then give a little more detail on using some of my more favorite tools for partitioning and formatting.

Partitioning:
The easiest way for me to explain this is through metaphor. Almost everyone I know has tried to put together one of those fiberboard bookshelves that you get from big box store. Now, before you put books, movies, toys or tools into this fiberboard bookshelf you actually have to install the shelves. Normally there are adjustable pegs so you can adjust the height between...

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Mac OS X has always been able to read NTFS drives, but tucked away in Mac OS X is a hidden option to enable write support to drives formatted as NTFS (NTFS stands for New Technology File System and is a proprietary file system format for Microsoft Windows). Enabling NTFS write support on the Mac is fairly technical and it’s not officially supported by Apple, making it an experimental feature that is best left in the hands of advanced users who understand the process and the potential repercussions.


Because this feature is officially unsupported by Apple, NTFS should not be considered a reliable cross-platform file system for moving files between a Mac and a Windows PC, users will still want to format drives for the FAT file system for optimal Mac to/from PC drive compatibility with full read and write support (perhaps a better solution for many users would be to use samba networking and share files directly through a local network between the PC and Mac in question)....

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Question:

I am using Ubuntu 10.04 as my operating system. I tried to install Windows 7 along with Ubuntu.

To do so I inserted the Windows CD and booted. When it asked for partitioning the drive, I clicked drive options "advanced" to partition. But then I couldn't click on 'new' and failed to create a partition.

How can my problem be solved?


Solution:1

Windows will refuse to see and change any Linux partitions on your drive. It is therefore recommended to change the partitions from a live Ubuntu session as was further elaborated in this answer:

Please do take the time to backup your data before you change partitions or install another OS.

For installing another OS (e.g. Windows) it is best practise to leave an unpartitioned space on the drive and let the installer partition and format it. Note that you cant have more than 4 primary partitions.

After having installed Windows you will have to...

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