How is /etc/motd updated?

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For legal reasons, Some people need to display a warning banner on their Linux machine before login so that a person requires to acknowledge the contents of the banner before entering the password. To do this, edit a /etc/issue.net file and fill it with the desired context.

Edit the /etc/issue.net file:

sudo nano /etc/issue.net

Here is mine banner as a sample, you can add your’s here:

############################################################### # Authorized access only! # # Disconnect IMMEDIATELY if you are not an authorized user!!! # # All actions Will be monitored and recorded # ###############################################################

Open /etc/ssh/sshd_config file:

sudo nano /etc/ssh/sshd_config

Locate the line, that contains Banner and uncomment it as given below:

Banner /etc/issue.net

Restart sshd:

sudo service sshd restart

To configure the MOTD, we need to edit...

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[A Debian 7 ‘Wheezy” Project]

I often SSH into all my Debian servers to do all my maintenance. I have close to a dozen of them. As an old Unix guy from the early 80’s (starting on CP/M!) I could never grasp the GUI. Sure, it has it’s place in the world, but it’s just not me. When SSHing into my servers, the Message of the Day pops up. Message of the Day (or motd) is a small text file located in the /etc directory. It’s purpose is to simply show a message the admin wants everyone to see before they get to a prompt. Easy peasy, right?

Someone once asked me if there was a way to modify the motd to show how many minutes the server was up. I searched the web and found 101 ways to do it, and none of them practical and all of them a failure on Debian. So, I decided to come up with something for myself. And it worked. Perfectly.

I’m a big fan of eye candy. And one package available in Debian made just for that is linuxlogo. It offers approximately 27 different ANSI and...

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This is a little guide to display dynamic login messages on a Debian system.

This is one of those things where the internet has plenty of resources, but they are mostly outdated and contradictory. Even typing man motd in Debian is a sad experience.

It is not a difficult thing to do but it can be a big waste of time to sort out the contradictions.

Hopefully, this post will help get the big picture from one single place.

Short history

Ancient times

Time ago, most distributions just printed the contents of /etc/motd upon login.

MOTD stands for message of the day (although it was static), and was put in place at installation time, only to be changed at upgrade time maybe.

Some distributions such as Arch keep operating this way.

Ubuntu came along

Then, Ubuntu Intrepid Ibex (2008) introduced a package update-motd, which consisted of

a script called update-motd. an entry in /etc/cron.d calling update-motd every 10 minutes. a...
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Ubuntu’s Message Of The Day or MOTD is the name given to the welcome screen users see when they login to a Ubuntu server using a remote terminal.

On the surface the output looks like it is sourced from a basic text file but it is a collection of modular shell scripts being executed. In this entry I explain how to add, edit and remove parts of the MOTD plus also apply colour text and ASCII art. It will only cover Ubuntu 14.04+.

As I mentioned the MOTD is comprised of a collection of shell scripts that run in a sequential order. These scripts can be found at /etc/update-motd.d/ so let’s take a look inside.

The filenames are named in NN-description where NN is the ascending start order with 00-header being the first script to be run.

A look into one of the files shows they are indeed shell scripts.

You can also run the script from terminal.

Disable MOTD scripts

Turning off one or more scripts is...

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One of the easiest way to protect and secure SSH logins by displaying warming message to UN-authorized users or display welcome or informational messages to authorized users.

Display SSH Banner Messages

Being a system administrator whenever configure Linux servers I always use to configure a security banners for ssh logins. The banner contains some security warning information or general information. See my example banner message which I used for my all servers.

ALERT! You are entering into a secured area! Your IP, Login Time, Username has been noted and has been sent to the server administrator!
This service is restricted to authorized users only. All activities on this system are logged.
Unauthorized access will be fully investigated and reported to the appropriate law enforcement agencies.

There are two way to display messages one is using issue.net file and second one is using MOTD file.

issue.net : Display a banner message before the...
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The message of the day file (/etc/motd) used to be so simple… but with great power often comes increased complexity. The Ubuntu motd file is very powerful and can be manipulated easily once you know how.

The actual file is composed in /var/run/motd so that the /etc file system can still be considered read only and the file /etc/motd is a symbolic link to /var/run/motd. To make the motd file a static file as before, just change the link to another file such as /etc/motd.static.

In older versions of Ubuntu, the file /etc/motd.tail was introduced for this purpose; however, it has been deprecated for some time in favor of the newer /etc/update-motd.d framework. The /etc/motd.tail file can still be used and is adapted into the new framework.

The update-motd framework was introduced with the update-motd package in Ubuntu Intrepid; it now resides in the libpam-modules package as part of the pam_motd module.

In earlier versions of update-motd, the...

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so theres a few fixes for y'all's complaints:
im running ubuntu server 10.04 x64
landscape python scripts are in
/usr/share/pyshared/landscape/sysinfo/

things i have edited are bolded

Ad Banner:
change landscapelink.py to read as follows (just delete the link and return header lines)

Code:

from twisted.internet.defer import succeed class LandscapeLink(object): def register(self, sysinfo): self._sysinfo = sysinfo def run(self): return succeed(None)

Disk usage path:
edit the following line (bolded path) in disk.py to reflect the location you want to display disk usage information for.

Code:

class Disk(object): def __init__(self, mounts_file="/proc/mounts", statvfs=os.statvfs): self._mounts_file = mounts_file self._statvfs = statvfs def register(self, sysinfo): self._sysinfo = sysinfo def run(self): main_info = get_filesystem_for_path("/media/Storage", self._mounts_file, ...
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Provided by:

libpam-modules_1.1.8-1ubuntu2_i386

NAME

update-motd - dynamic MOTD generation

SYNOPSIS

/etc/update-motd.d/*

DESCRIPTION

UNIX/Linux system adminstrators often communicate important information to console and remote users by maintaining text in the file /etc/motd, which is displayed by the pam_motd(8) module on interactive shell logins. Traditionally, this file is static text, typically installed by the distribution and only updated on release upgrades, or overwritten by the local administrator with pertinent information. Ubuntu introduced the update-motd framework, by which the motd(5) is dynamically assembled from a collection of scripts at login. Executable scripts in /etc/update-motd.d/* are executed by pam_motd(8) as the root user at each login, and this information is concatenated in /var/run/motd. The order of script execution is determined by the run- parts(8) --lsbsysinit...
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> On Thu, Jun 7, 2012 at 6:47 PM, Helmut Schneider

[hidden email]

>

> wrote:

> > Tom H wrote:

> >> On Thu, Jun 7, 2012 at 6:05 PM, Helmut Schneider

[hidden email]

>

> >> wrote:

> >> > compdoc wrote:

> >> >

> >> >> and then find out why /var/run/motd is not being generated

> >> >

> >> > That's why I'm here. ;)

> > >

> >> for motd to be displayed at boot?

> >

> > Hm, only at boot?! No. Or?! Because I meanwhile found out that

> > /var/run/motd is created after a reboot but *is not* after a

> > (remote-)login (via ssh):

> >

> > helmut@mail:~$ ls -la /var/run/motd

> > -rw-r--r-- 1 root root 1736 Jun 8 00:32 /var/run/motd

> > helmut@mail:~$ last -6R

> > helmut pts/0 Fri Jun 8 00:41 still logged in

> > root pts/0 Fri Jun 8 00:41 - 00:41 (00:00)

> > root pts/0 Fri Jun 8 00:40 - 00:41 (00:00)

> > helmut ...

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