How does Unity work in multi-monitor configurations?

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Quote from Bolimomo:

I am interested in this discussion too. I am using TradeStation on an Intel quad core machine. The TradeStation software, or the "orchart.exe" process specifically, is only executed on 1 core and 1 hyperthread. Sometimes even though that core/hyperthread is very busy, the other cores just remain idle. I tried spinning off "new desktop" from within TradeStation but all the "desktops" in TradeStation still just use the same "orchart.exe" process - thus in the same core.

If you use multiple VM desktops to run TradeStation, would TradeStation require you to have a second/third login? Or can you still use the same one?

Any idea to make TradeStation works over multiple cores will be interesting.

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I think it was some bumpiness in overwriting my custom configs with

the defaults and those things butting heads. I definitely saved

x-configs each go-through. I got far enough to see X start on all of

the windows, even load by background, then fall apart (also, blackbox

was totally happy). For instance, gnome-settings-daemon still eats it

on startup, but Unity is up and running, and that works for me as long

as it's happy with my vast wealth of screen real-estate!

I think that everything gets pretty unhappy if you don't have xinerama
enabled. That seems to be the secret sauce.

Justin

On Thu, Apr 26, 2012 at 6:09 PM, Ric Moore wrote:

> On 04/26/2012 05:24 PM, Justin Hart wrote:

>>

>> The title says most of what I know about my issue. I start Gnome or

>> Unity, and I get one screen with my desktop background, and working

>> UI, the others give me the classic x-org plain...

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Since the "Direct HMD Access from Apps" Rift display mode does not seem to be working 100% yet, I've had to fiddle around quite a bit to figure out how to launch demos properly.



UPDATE: For demos built with SDK 0.4.1 or newer, this is all *less* of a problem, but the below checklist is a great fallback. There are still quite a few demos that do things differently, so I would like to recommend the "Unofficial VR Game Manager/Launcher by Bilago", which can be found here. It can be a great help to experiment with what makes a demo tick, and then remember those settings for next time.

So after some trial and error, below is the checklist I go by now.


Note that this checklist assumes the following:
You are using Windows 8 (though it may apply to other Windows versions), The Unity demo you are trying to run was built with DirectX11 turned off, You're using a single monitor + your DK2 (known issue that multi-monitor config results in judder).

1. Rift...

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By Buffy Cranford

Savvy computer users recognize the value of backing up their priceless files on a spare hard drive or rewritable disks. When hearty files begin chewing up hard drive space and impacting PC performance, computer users often examine their Central Processing Unit (CPU) performance and take appropriate measures for freeing up disk space. In a Web-hosting environment, multiple-server configurations are preferred for similar reasons. By utilizing multiple servers, a Web-hosting company creates a versatile environment by allocating resources among two or more servers. A multiple-server configuration results in quicker Web site load times during peak periods and drastically reduces downtime for a Web site if one server in the configuration fails.

What Is a Server?

Servers include the basic features of a desktop PC (processor, hard drive, RAM), yet also feature numerous processors, hard drives and multiple gigabytes of RAM to handle behind-the-scenes...

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The best types in object oriented systems are ones that have a single responsibility. But as systems grow, other concerns tend to creep in. System monitoring, such as logging, event counters, parameter validation, and exception handling are just some examples of areas where this is common. These cross-cutting concerns often require large amounts of repetive code throughout the application and if your design choice changes, for example you change your logging framework, then the logging calls must be changed in many places throughout the code set.

Interception is a technique that enables you to add code that will run before and after a method call on a target object. The call is intercepted and additional processing can happen. When you perform this coding process manually, you are following what is commonly known as the decorator pattern. Writing decorators requires that the types in question be designed for it in the beginning, and requires a different decorator type for...

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In this guide, we’ll review baseline targets, recommendations, tools, resources, and common workflows for performance analysis and bug squashing for Unity VR applications.

General Tips

VR application debugging is a matter of getting insight into how the application is structured and executed, gathering data to evaluate actual performance, evaluating it against expectation, then methodically isolating and eliminating problems.

When analyzing or debugging, it is crucial to proceed in a controlled way so that you know specifically what change results in a different outcome. Focus on bottlenecks first. Only compare apples to apples, and change one thing at a time (e.g., resolution, hardware, quality, configuration).

Always be sure to profile, as systems are full of surprises. We recommend starting with simple code, and optimizing as you go - don’t try to optimize too early.

We recommend creating a 2D, non-VR version of your camera rig so you can swap...

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Display different scenes on multiple monitors?

No, you can't.

Display different cameras from the-same scene on multiple monitors?

Yes! with the Display class.

The fact is that you cannot run two different scenes at the-same time. You cannot.

However, you can use Application.LoadLevelAdditive (obsolete) or SceneManager.LoadScene("sceneName",LoadSceneMode.Additive); to extend the current scene which has nothing to do with what you are asking.

What you can do:

Position multiple cameras in different places in the-same scene then render each camera to different display.

The max supported display is 8.

You can use Display.displays.Length to check the amount Displays connected.

Display.displays[0] is the main/primary display.

Display.displays[1] Next display

Display.displays[2] Next display

Display.displays[3] Another Next display

Call the Activate function to activate the display.

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Update: some of the videos are no longer available, I found some of them on YouTube and added slides. If you know where these videos are now please post in comments.

Unity3D is great for indie developers. We have yet to build a large Unity project, but we’ve built a couple of small projects so far but during this process we did see Unity3D from the ugly side. It seems that the engine can do some things blazingly fast and easy but some other ones were clearly neglected during development. But that’s another post.

So, I’ve tried to find out how big teams work on large Unity projects if even we are struggling. But no luck.

Ones were mumbling about source control, separating control over scenes editing etc. That’s kind of obvious and shows that those people don’t have any experience at all.

But recently I watched all the videos from Unite 11 conference. I really wish I could visit it and talk to Unity gurus. But anyway, here are the videos I found useful....

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Unity in 10.10 appeared to be focused around single monitor configurations with a single tasking workflow. This works quite well on a netbook which has limited screen real estate.

How does the present version of Unity scale up to include multi-monitor and multi-tasking workflows?

For 10.10 multi monitor support was rudimentary, as that was focused on netbooks -- if you were giving a presentation and you ran Unity we didn't want the top panel overlaid on your presentation.

For 11.04 and 11.10 the multimonitor support is much better. I'll talk about how my setup works with Nvidia, but I don't have the hardware to comment on ATI and Intel support so hopefully someone will post seperate answers for those.

For 12.04 and 12.10 there is a specification for how to improve multi monitor support in the desktop.

Nvidia Twinview

Each monitor gets a panel with the window controls, the application menu, and then the indicators. When the windows...

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Over the past few months we have been working on improving the multi-monitor experience in Ubuntu. We took the opportunity at UDS in November to get some feedback on a prototype, which shows how we are planning to develop the multi-monitor experience over the next few cycles:

Here is a short video of the prototype in action at UDS:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lbwNMnNUGFA

We invested in a six monitor rig and the prototype to test a number of different display configurations and to ensure that our design ideas scale well. However, our main focus for Precise is to ensure that we deliver a reliable and supportive experience for the core use cases, such as connecting to a second display or projector, disconnecting displays and using a closed laptop with an external display.

So here is the Phase 1 specification, scoped for the next couple of cycles, incorporating the feedback we got from the prototype and sessions at...

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It’s important to understand how Unity works, so that its limitations can actually become a guided path. This post will show some of the most typical mistakes developers make when approaching Unity for the first time.

By Alan Zucconi, Independent Developer

It is undeniable that Unity has made game development accessible to many people. Whether you like it or not, it is becoming one of the de-facto tools used by independent developers. Its gentle learning curve has been both Unity's greatest feature and downfall. By simplifying some aspects of game development, it has imposed its own way of doings things. Features which should be trivial can be incredibly challenging if you're trying to fight against Unity's logic and workflow. It's important to understand how Unity works, so that its limitations can actually become a guided path. This post will show some of the most typical mistakes developers make when approaching Unity for the first time.

1. Get the...

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For 10.10 multi monitor support was rudimentary, as that was focused on netbooks -- if you were giving a presentation and you ran Unity we didn't want the top panel overlaid on your presentation.

For 11.04 and 11.10 the multimonitor support is much better. I'll talk about how my setup works with Nvidia, but I don't have the hardware to comment on ATI and Intel support so hopefully someone will post seperate answers for those.

For 12.04 and 12.10 there is a specification for how to improve multi monitor support in the desktop.

Nvidia Twinview

Each monitor gets a panel with the window controls, the application menu, and then the indicators. When the windows are maximized each window gets integrated into the top panel of each screen. The indicators are cloned so that you're never too far from the system menu.

When the windows are unmaximized the application menu for that app will be displayed on whichever panel the application is on so that...

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Curiouser and curiouser.

Last night, I wrote:

>Fusion apparently[/b] gives the impression

of being broken, rather than simply missing a feature

by design. T

I must confess that I wrote this without having used Unity myself since an earlier beta release--hence the qualifier. This is because I normally run a dual-headed Mac Pro, with the host on one screen and the guest (XP) on the other, and prefer not to visually merge the two OS's. I do not run Fusion full screen, in case I need to move some host windows over to the second monitor from time to time.

So this morning, I decided to experiment with Unity's behavior first hand. While running in the above configuration, I clicked on the Unity icon in the Fusion menu bar. To my alarm, all my Fusion windows disappeared entirely. including the Library panel. More than that, the Fusion icon itself (on the Mac memu bar) lost the little triangle underneath, suggesting that the entire application had...

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That question has been well covered in the AskUbuntu community, where you have two good answers here:

https://askubuntu.com/questions/6273/open-source-graphics-card-options

https://askubuntu.com/questions/9886/how-does-unity-work-in-multi-monitor-configurations

Although I don't have a multimonitor setup, it's true that Ubuntu 11.04 and Ubuntu 11.10 have improved quite much the multimonitor support, so you shouldn't have problems getting a nice dual monitor configuration out of your ATI or NVIDIA graphics card.

I prefer NVIDIA: Nouveau drivers are fine, but their propietary drivers are really good if you want to take advantage of 3D support. My experience with AMD/ATI GPUs hasn't been so good, although their support to Open Source drivers is fantastic. Somehow, this hasn't materialized in really good open source drivers for the moment.

Anyway, any modern card will work fine under Ubuntu for sure, even better with propietary drivers if you've got no...

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Since Unity can create only one rendering window, you'll need something that fools windows into believing it has a ultra-high resolution wide desktop. There are several workaround methods for this:

1) install XP, which gives you the Horizontal Spanning mode, which allows wide desktops.

2) use a Matrox DualHead2Go to be able to split a "wide desktop" to two video signals. However, I have no experience with Laptops, and how you would configure your laptop display to show one part of your large desktop

3) buy another graphics card, link them with SLI/CrossFire, and use nvidia Surround / ATI EyeFinity, which re-introduces Horizontal Span as a brand new feature

4) without additional hardware, there is a tweak where you can get Unity to open a wide screen window which can be distributed to the two outputs of your graphics card, using the standard "DualView" mode that Windows provides.

The trick is to create a custom resolution (with the nvidia control...

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