How do I find out which process is eating up my bandwidth?

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I think I’m being the victim of a bug here. Sometimes while I’m working (I still don’t know why), my network traffic goes up to 200 KB/s and stays that way, even tough I’m not doing anything internet-related.

This sometimes happens to me with the CPU usage. When it does, I just run a top command to find out which process is responsible and then kill it. Problem is: I have no way of knowing which process is responsible for my high network usage. Both the resource monitor and the top command only tell me my total network usage, neither of them tells me process specific network info.

I’ve found questions here about monitoring total bandwidth usage, but, as I mentioned, that’s not what I need. Is there another command I can use to find out which process is getting out of hand?

The command iftop gives results that disagree entirely with the information reported by System Monitor. While the latter claims there’s high network traffic, the former claims there’s barely...

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Your sensationalism is never ending, really. Even with live tiles enabled on a bunch of apps the OS uses less RAM than 7. Anyone who thinks flashing a bunch of icons "sucks RAM" doesn't know very much about computers.

The WinRT API is designed with restrictions on bandwidth use so it can't "suck bandwidth for nothing". Apps are restricted to certain callbacks for performing certain updates.

I have a ton of live apps and none are currently using bandwidth because every single one of them is done as a "check in" function on a timer. You can track EXACTLY how much bandwidth each app is using and it logs its totally bandwidth. Not only that, but bandwidth used by the app and by the live tile is completely separate columns, and all this information is available in the task manager.

So to summarize, cut the crap.

Click to...

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While there are many network monitoring tools available for Linux, most of them monitor network traffic to and from your computer or a particular interface. However, there are times when you want to nail down a particular process that’s using up too much of the bandwidth, and there is a tool, dubbed NetHogs, that lets you do just that.

In this article, we will discuss the basics of NetHogs as well as the features it provides.

According to the utility’s man page, NetHogs is a small “net top” tool. Instead of breaking the network traffic down per protocol or per subnet, like most tools do, it groups bandwidth by process.

If there’s suddenly a lot of network traffic, you can fire up NetHogs and immediately see which PID is causing this, making it easy to identify programs that have gone wild and are suddenly taking up your bandwidth. Since NetHogs heavily relies on “/proc,” it currently runs on Linux only.

Users of Debian-based systems like Ubuntu can...

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That has "what" to do with internet bandwidth and download speed?

--
Regards,

Richard Urban
Microsoft MVP Windows Shell/User

If you knew as much as you think you know,
You would realize that you don't know what you thought you knew!

"Andrew E." wrote in message
news:...
> Try R.clicking the task bar,open task mgr,see whats running and how much
> resources its useing.
>
> "" wrote:
>
>> Recently a problem installing the newest version of Zone Alarm left me
>> in an odd situation where I couldn't access websites but was still able
>> to send email, IM, and do pretty much anything else that wasn't
>> browsing websites. The file sharing program Shareaza also worked.
>> Shareaza has a bandwidth monitor, and it indicated that the amount of
>> data I was downloading was perhaps four times what it normally is. And
>> this was true until I finally found out how to fix Zone Alarm and
>>...

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Q. How do I find out what process are eating up all my memory. Is it possible to find out how long that memory has been allocated to particular process? How do I kill that process to free up memory?

A. You need to use the top command which provides a dynamic real-time view of a running system. It can display system summary information as well as a list of tasks currently being managed by the Linux kernel.

Simply type top command:
# top

top command will tell you the percentage of physical memory a particular process is using at any given time. As far as I know, there is no easy way that can tell how long that memory has been allocated.

You can also use ps command to get more information about process.
# ps aux | less

To kill process use kill command under Linux. Read man page of top and ls for more information.

Share this tutorial...
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Find Out Which Program Is Using My Bandwidth 7,6/10 1249 reviews

To find out how much bandwidth I use everyday, I installed NetWorx, a monitor software. How to find out which software is secretly consuming my bandwidth. up vote 6 down vote favorite. 2. To find out how much bandwidth I use everyday, I installed NetWorx, a monitor. downloaded 270MB in an hour. Considering my monthly download limitation is only 100GB, that's unacceptable. How can I find out which software is secretly stealing my bandwidth? internet. share improve this question. How do I find out which process is eating up my bandwidth? up vote 86 down vote favorite. 39. I think I'm being the victim of a bug here. Sometimes while I'm. as I mentioned, that's not what I need. Is there another command I can use to find out which process is getting out of hand? The command iftop gives results that disagree entirely with the information reported by System Monitor. While the latter claims there's high network. How do...

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Dear Lifehacker,
Lately it seems like my high speed connection is bogged down, and I'm getting a creepy feeling that someone's stealing my bandwidth on my Wi-Fi network.

How can I find out if other people are leeching my Wi-Fi, and how do I stop them if they are?

Signed,
Paranoid or Not?

Dear PoN,
Besides the fact that your Wi-Fi moocher may be slowing down your connection, people connected to your network may also have access to some of your shared folders (depending on what security measures you use), and if someone's using your connection to do illegal things, it could even bring the authorities to your doorstep. Don't worry, though, we can help you find out if, indeed, your Wi-Fi is being stolen and help you put an end to it. (Note: If it turns out that no one's using your Wi-Fi, you may want to check out our guide to fixing your slow Wi-Fi connection.)

Without further ado, there are a few methods for sniffing out wireless...

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Sep 4, 2008

Here's my situation:

I run a site that does a lot of transfers AND uses a lot of CPU resources. I think I would like to get two different hosting plans to deal with these different patterns of usage, but where can I find a good host offering lots of bandwidth that is content to have it actually used? I've been with DreamHost for a while but they don't allow "data archiving" or whatever (and I have arguments against their claims but it's neither here nor there). So, really, where the heck can a guy find a good host offering plenty of space and bandwidth? Keep in mind I need pretty much no CPU power with such a plan; the web server can be stone cold stupid for all I care, as I can just get a VPS to run the CPU-intensive part of my site!

Find User Bandwidth From SSH (CPanel) How To Find File Process Which Is Using Bandwidth Find A High Bandwidth VPS Solution Using Find Command With Regex To Find All Number-only Filenames Bandwidth Monitoring :: Create...
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I think I'm being the victim of a bug here. Sometimes while I'm working (I still don't know why), my network traffic goes up to 200 KB/s and stays that way, even tough I'm not doing anything internet-related.

This sometimes happens to me with the CPU usage. When it does, I just run a top command to find out which process is responsible and then kill it. Problem is: I have no way of knowing which process is responsible for my high network usage. Both the resource monitor and the top command only tell me my total network usage, neither of them tells me process specific network info.

I've found questions here about monitoring total bandwidth usage, but, as I mentioned, that's not what I need. Is there another command I can use to find out which process is getting out of hand?

The command iftop gives results that disagree entirely with the information reported by System Monitor. While the latter claims there's high network traffic, the former claims there's barely...

0 0
10

Click….wait. Click….wait. Click….ARG! Sound familiar? That’s the sound of someone running out of Internet bandwidth.

A lot of things can drain away the capacity of that pipe that connects your computer to the Internet. It could be other people or devices on your network, or it could even be malicious applications or services running on the PC itself. The problem can get so bad that some people will toss out their computer and buy a new one.

It doesn’t have to be that way. While the problem could be coming from anywhere, it isn’t impossible to troubleshoot if you know where to look, what tools to use, and what to do when you find the culprit. In this article, I’m going to give you a hand and walk you through the process of tracking down that bandwidth hog and shutting him down.

Track Down The Bandwidth Bandit Via Your Router

You could start just about anywhere when it comes to isolating the bandwidth hog on your network or inside your computer, but in...

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the great randini said:

some things that may be using your bandwidth, and doing so in the background would be updates (i.e. java updater adobe updater itunes). anything else may be somthing to worry about and can be controlled via the windows firewall, via outgoing connections.

how to check what connections

open command prompt ( click start > type cmd in the run box

type
netstat -ano
that is all network connections in all states
this one is cool because you open task manager and click on the processes tab and click on view and select colum add "pid" (pid stands for process identifier).
now look for the pid from the netstat -ano and match it up to the protocol and you can identify the program making network connections.

or
netstat -b
is a realtime check

how to use wireshark = http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NHLTa29iovU

Thanks for this. I am familiar with netstat. I am however looking for...

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Some Internet companies give a great service, however if you are only on a monthly data allowance and this runs out then when you are switched to a much slower speed sometimes this can prove hard to use. Or even if you have unlimited Internet the following might also give you a bit more speed.

However you can try a couple of things I use to help.

Make your browsers start-up page also home page by typing in the following in the browsers address bar about:blank this gives instant start-up of your browser.

Now for your search engine, create a favourite in your Favourites bar for your search engine, be it Google, Yahoo, Bing or any other search engine you use.

If you still have access to Internet Explorer 6, 7, or 8 go to any of your favourite websites and in Options click on the “save Offline” this means even if you are not connected to the Internet access to some pages will be instant, far faster than any Internet connection.

Downloading, yes...

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Memberships represent individual people. (The law calls this "a natural person." At NearlyFreeSpeech.NET at least, corporations are not people.) A company, club, or organization (we'll go with "company" for the rest of this FAQ entry, but it applies just as well to clubs, organizations, or other types of groups) has no arms, fingers, and eyes and cannot read our Terms and Conditions of Service or complete our signup form. If you're signing up to host stuff for any kind of organization in which you're not the sole participant, you still have to create your membership as yourself, at which point you, personally, agree to adhere to our Terms and Conditions of Service. This is not too different from opening a company bank account; you still have to give them your own ID and sign the signature card and checks with your own name, not "President" or "Company Name, Inc."

It is very important to understand that once you create a membership for yourself, it's yours. (To reiterate the...

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When my laptop is turned on, it starts downloading from the Internet – BUT – nothing is supposed to be downloading! How do I figure out what’s happening?

My normal response for this type of problem is to turn to Process Monitor, a free SysInternals utility from Microsoft. The problem is that it’s a pretty geeky tool, and requires a little patience and understanding to get useful results.

Of late, I’ve found myself firing up a completely different utility included in Windows 7 and 8 to monitor network activity. It’s a utility that quickly displays a lot of information about what’s going on. It actually can monitor several areas of your computer’s activity, but I’ll focus here on networking.

Perfmon

Perfmon, the system performance monitor, has been around for a long time. If you run “perfmon” (Windows Key + “R”, enter “perfmon”, click OK) you’ll end up with something similar to this.

It’s a fairly intimidating application, unless you’re...

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