How can I install XFCE along side unity?

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Hi guys. This is my first post on this forum with this account (my "Ubuntu One" account), however I have posted on here before with an old account back when I was using ubuntu maybe 4-5 years ago. I'm very much a beginner; I went back to windows after using ubuntu those years ago because I preferred it for gaming and was a big gamer back then. I've started to get back into linux, however, and have tried Linux Mint alongside windows, and am now back on to Ubuntu alongside windows.I'd like to try out the XFCE Desktop Environment to see if I prefer it to Unity.I understand that this question has been asked before on here, and I did search the forums and found a few threads about it, but none were tailored to my particular question. So, my question is this:What is the best way to install XFCE alongside Unity? I understand that I could use a Xubuntu live-CD, but I'm looking for a way to work with my current install without doing that. I've heard people mention doing:Code:sudo...

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Best way to install XFCE (Xubuntu) alongside (Unity) Ubuntu 13.10?

location: ubuntuforums.com - date: November 19, 2013
Hi guys. This is my first post on this forum with this account (my "Ubuntu One" account), however I have posted on here before with an old account back when I was using ubuntu maybe 4-5 years ago. I'm very much a beginner; I went back to windows after using ubuntu those years ago because I preferred it for gaming and was a big gamer back then. I've started to get back into linux, however, and have tried Linux Mint alongside windows, and am now back on to Ubuntu alongside windows. I'd like to try out the XFCE Desktop Environment to see if I prefer it to Unity. I understand that this question has been asked before on here, and I did search the forums and found a few threads about it, but none were tailored to my particular question. So, my question is this: What is the best way to install XFCE alongside Unity? I understand that I could use a Xubuntu live-CD, but...

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I found Unity to be very memory consuming and sometimes it hangs the whole system. So here comes xfce - A lightweight Desktop which is fast and uses less system resources. you will find it much like gnome 2.x. It comes as the default UI in Xubuntu. But it can also be installed along side unity in ubuntu. Let's start!.



How to Install xfce in ubuntu

1. You can install xfce from the following command. (this will install just the xfce desktop and applications will remain the same)

sudo apt-get install xfce
or

2. You can install the whole xubuntu desktop (This will kind of turn ubuntu into xubuntu with default xubuntu apps/softwares)

sudo apt-get install xubuntu-desktop
I prefer and recommend option one i.e install only xfce and use your default applications.

After Installation

After installing logout and select xfce Session by clicking on the ubuntu logo (as shown in the image below) and login you can switch back to unity...

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Thanks, your video presentation reflects the general approach I had tried. For a "static" (vs "rolling") installation, that approach would work well enough... but an app's .desktop file gets touched (overwritten) by apt, or dpkg (?) every time an updated version of its package gets installed. I had "kinda, sorta" sidestepped that issue (the rewritten .destop file defeating my custom category declaration) by editing the .desktop file for each of my various, custom-placed app ~~ performing a SaveAs to a diffeent name. That had proven to be a half-workable solution. My menu file doesn't display the "stock" freedesktop hierarchy of categories... but OpenWith, via thunar file manager, winds up picking up the duplicate pairs of .desktop files.

From what I've read, the Xfce devs opted for "freedesktop.org compliance" to suit the mainstream audience (after bloggers repeatedly raised criticism about the lack thereof when reviewing earlier Xfce versions). Ha! How quickly times change...

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Chromebooks aren’t “just a browser” — they’re Linux laptops. You can easily install a full Linux desktop alongside Chrome OS and instantly switch between the two with a hotkey — no rebooting necessary.

We performed this process with the $249 Samsung Chromebook, also known as the Samsung Series 3 Chromebook. If you have another Chromebook, read on anyway — it’s the same process.

Crouton vs. ChrUbuntu

Installing Ubuntu Linux on your Chromebook isn’t as simple as installing the standard Ubuntu system — at least not at the moment. You’ll need to choose a project developed specially for your Chromebook. There are two popular options:

ChrUbuntu: ChrUbuntu is a Ubuntu system built for Chromebooks. It works like a traditional dual-boot system. You can restart your Chromebook and choose between Chrome OS and Ubuntu at boot time. ChrUbuntu can be installed on your Chromebook’s internal storage or on a USB device or SD card. Crouton: Crouton actually uses...
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There are no conflicts between XFCE and Unity, and Nautilus works perfectly fine on Xubuntu 12.04 and 12.10.

If you wish to install XFCE in Ubuntu, install either xubuntu-desktop (for XFCE + Xubuntu branding + all Xubuntu default apps), or just xfce by itself if you don't want to end up with two sets of default apps.

sudo apt-get install xubuntu-desktop

or

sudo apt-get install xfce4

Additionally - and I stress that this is based only on my own personal experience on one laptop - I've found that Xubuntu boots and runs much more quickly than Ubuntu whether Unity is installed or not. Based on this experience, I always prefer to install Unity on Xubuntu instead of XFCE on Ubuntu if I want an OS with both desktop environments. You may wish to try the same next time you reinstall your OS and see if you notice any performance...

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Note: For those with HiDPI screens, you must let Linux scale your content (otherwise it will be poorly upscaled by Windows).

After (notice there are no more blurry fonts):

/mnt/c/Users/Dave/Desktop > xrandr xrandr: Failed to get size of gamma for output default Screen 0: minimum 0 x 0, current 3000 x 2000, maximum 32768 x 32768 default connected primary 3000x2000+0+0 0mm x 0mm 3000x2000 0.00* /mnt/c/Users/Dave/Desktop > xdpyinfo | head -75 name of display: 0:0 version number: 11.0 vendor string: HC-Consult vendor release number: 11803000 maximum request size: 16777212 bytes motion buffer size: 256 bitmap unit, bit order, padding: 32, LSBFirst, 32 image byte order: LSBFirst number of supported pixmap formats: 7 supported pixmap formats: depth 1, bits_per_pixel 1, scanline_pad 32 depth 4, bits_per_pixel 8, scanline_pad 32 depth 8, bits_per_pixel 8, scanline_pad 32 depth 15, bits_per_pixel 16, scanline_pad 32 depth 16, bits_per_pixel 16,...
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In the Linux world, a war has been raging for a couple years. At stake are the hearts and minds of its user base, the combatants the various distributions of Linux itself. For some time, Ubuntu Linux has been the clear leader in the fight, amassing more users than any other. Canonical and its baby seemed poised to take over the desktop Linux market completely. That is, until it released Unity, first as an option in Ubuntu 10.10 Maverick Meerkat, and then the default going forward. In the harsh world of desktop operating systems, often how you stand out from the crowd is how you stay ahead. Unity definitely stood out, alright.

Unity has caused an uproar in the Linux community. What’s worse, by all appearances it has caused a defection of users in droves to distros like Linux Mint, now the second most popular Debian-based distribution out there and gaining fast on Ubuntu. If you follow my Linux travels, back in September I talked a bit about Unity and its effect on Ubuntu’s...

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Ever since Gnome went ahead with their Gnome Shell idea, the Linux community has been at a frenzy to find a new desktop environment that is right for them. A majority of users used Gnome 2, but the introduction of Gnome 3 attracted a lot of users, forking Gnome 2 into MATE, modifying it with Cinnamon and Unity, or flock completely away from anything Gnome-related to desktop environments such as Xfce XFCE: Your Lightweight, Speedy, Fully-Fledged Linux Desktop , LXDE Using An Old Computer? Give It New Life With LXDE , or KDE Enjoy A Clean, Improved Desktop With KDE 4.7 [Linux] .

But the Gnome desktop environment came with a lot of popular software that supported it very well, which still leaves a lot of people trying to find the version of Gnome — MATE, Gnome Shell, Unity, or Cinnamon — that’s appropriate for them. Here’s a quick take at...

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If you want MATE without the minty-freshness (sic) you could use the debian repo specifically for Ubuntu.

This repository contains 300Mb of pure Mate-desktop packages - that is, the Gnome-2 packages after the fork together with fixes released since.

Examining the package list, there doesn't appear to be much/if any updates to the base Ubuntu package lists.

What this means is that - unlike the Linux Mint derivative - the Mate-Desktop in this repo will sit much more comfortably along side any other desktops installed on Ubuntu - for example, Gnome-Shell, Unity, LXDE etc..

The Linux Mint Mate repo contains Mint specific changes but more importantly, later versions of the Gnome-3 packages that will upgrade Unity & Gnome-Shell packages - it is a more one way install.

to install the repository

sudo add-apt-repository "deb http://packages.mate-desktop.org/repo/ubuntu $(lsb_release -cs) main"

install MATE desktop

sudo apt-get update...
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Linux newbies have probably heard a lot about Ubuntu, but it isn’t the only Linux distribution. In fact, Ubuntu’s standard Unity desktop is still controversial among long-time Linux users today.

Many Linux users prefer a more traditional desktop interface, and Linux Mint offers that. As Ubuntu focuses more on Ubuntu for phones, Linux Mint may be an even clearer choice in the future.

No, Ubuntu isn’t terrible. Some people prefer Ubuntu’s Unity desktop and love it. But you’ll probably have an easier time getting to grips with Linux Mint instead of Ubuntu.

The Issues With Ubuntu

Let’s take a quick look at Ubuntu’s Unity desktop first. New users (and even experienced Linux users) will have many issues with it:

The standard File/Edit/View menu is completely separated from each window and appears on the top bar, like a Mac. This is unusual for Windows users. Worse yet, the File/Edit/View menu is actually hidden until you move your mouse up to...
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