Questions about: apt

apt-get has a few options which looks the same to me: autoclean, autoremove and clean. What do each of them do? From the apt-get man page: clean: clean clears out the local repository of retrieved package files. It removes everything but the lock fil
I have noticed on a few machines in which my application's user. config file is somehow becoming corrupted and is empty when opening. I can't seem to figure out why this is happened
There are 4 steps to setting up a simple repository for yourself 1. Install dpkg-dev2. Put the packages in a directory3
I resolved running: sudo apt-key adv --keyserver keyserver. ubuntu. com --recv-keys 1397BC53640DB551 The command above download the missing key using the hexadecimal numbers given in the error (1397BC53640DB551) with apt-key
What, if anything, is the difference between this command: sudo apt-get clean And this command: sudo apt-get clean all On my Lubuntu 12. 04 system, simulating these commands reveals their behavior to be exactly the same: ek@Apok:~$ apt-get -s clean N
If I use apt-get install -qq mono-devel, I expect it to be quiet except for errors, according to the help: -qq No output except for errors Instead I get: Extracting templates from packages: 100% Selecting previously unselected package binfmt-support.
A quick and short reasoning on why a certain package was installed can be found out by typing the following command in a terminal (Applications -> Accessories -> Terminal) : aptitude why Replace with the name of the package you are interested i
It took quite some time for me to find this solution. When the average user starts googling this, they are going to find all sorts of things which do not apply, for example: http://itsfoss. com/fix-update-errors-ubuntu-1404/https://askubuntu
Answer #: 1 yes, apt-get can do that, and can do it in a nice way. Append following to ~/. bash_funcs update-repo() { for source in "$@"; do sudo apt-get update -o Dir::Etc::sourcelist="sources
Ubuntu 16. 04 is out now, and it’s packed with exciting new changes. You have snap packages, BSD’s popular file system – ZFS – and other things