Adding custom applications to Gnome launcher

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The applications launchers Gnome knows about are .desktop files in /usr/share/applications, and ~/.local/share/applications. You can create custom launchers for whatever is in your home folder, by either manually creating and editing a custom .desktop file, or by using Alacarte, the old Gnome menu editor.

The Gnome desktop file documentation can be of help: https://developer.gnome.org/integration-guide/stable/desktop-files.html.en

The custom launcher is just a text file, named, for example, EclipseEE.desktop, with the following content:

[Desktop Entry] Name=Eclipse EE Exec=/home/mrPeterson/path_to_executable StartupNotify=true Terminal=false Type=Application...
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by

Shaftoe2702

Last Updated August 12, 2015 17:01 PM

Looking for a utility that allows me insert an item into the list of applications that GNOME knows about.

For example:

I have downloaded Eclipse EE (I have some very special plugins that I need to work with, and those plugins don't "like" the version available in the default repository). I'm using GNOME 3, on Ubuntu 11.10. So I want to execute Eclipse w/o opening a terminal and running it.

It must be something very simple.

Answers 4

The applications launchers Gnome knows about are .desktop files in /usr/share/applications, and ~/.local/share/applications. You can create custom launchers for whatever is in your home folder, by either manually creating and editing a custom .desktop file, or by using Alacarte, the old Gnome menu editor.

The Gnome desktop file documentation can be of help:...

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You can use Main Menu for this. If not, install it first:

sudo apt-get install alacarte

1. Open Main Menu

2. See the example

After that you can call your applications with name: "command_of_application".

Edit: I missed that you had asked for applications in your home directory. If so, command must be the full path of that application.


The applications launchers Gnome knows about are .desktop files in /usr/share/applications, and ~/.local/share/applications. You can create custom launchers for whatever is in your home folder, by either manually creating and editing a custom .desktop file, or by using Alacarte, the old Gnome menu editor.

The Gnome desktop file documentation can be of help: https://developer.gnome.org/integration-guide/stable/desktop-files.html.en

The custom launcher is just a text file, named, for example, EclipseEE.desktop, with the following content:

[Desktop Entry] Name=Eclipse EE...
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Back in Gnome 2, we can simply right-clicked on a panel and chose “Create custom launcher” to create custom application launchers. But since the advent of Gnome 3, the panels where we add our frequently-used applications have been replaced with the Dash.

Alacarte is a graphical menu editor that lets you edit, add, and delete menu entries. It follows the freedesktop.org menu specification and should work with any desktop environment that uses this specification.

Alacarte is the same menu editor that was available in Gnome 2. The only difference is the way we open it. In Gnome 3, we now select it from the App List.

But first we need to install Alacarte. As root, execute the following command in your terminal:

yum install alacarte

Run Alacarte by searching and clicking it from the Applications menu (it shows up as Main Menu) or executing it from the command line. Doing so should show you this familiar window:

Alacarte - Main Menu

Choose the...

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I'm using Debian testing, and I have been switched to GNOME 3 by the Debian update yesterday. I'm not very comfortable with the UI. I wanted to customize everything like I had it with GNOME 2, but I simply couldn't find any way to change preferences like I'm used to. I've digged some, but all answers I could find did not help me achieve my goals. So please, if anyone knows the solution to this I'd be thankful:

I want several launchers that launch terminals, with different arguments and different coloring/title. I have searched everything and there seems to be no menu, no right-click, nothing which is standard in any UI I know. How can I create several launchers in this bar on the left side that launch the same application, just with different parameters? With GNOME 2 this was a piece of cake.

I want to switch between different terminals using ALT-TAB. Right now, I'm always just getting to the same, already-opened terminal. When I open two terminals by simply creating...

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Looking for a utility that allows me insert an item into the list of applications that GNOME knows about.

For example:

I have downloaded Eclipse EE (I have some very special plugins that I need to work with, and those plugins don't "like" the version available in the default repository). I'm using GNOME 3, on Ubuntu 11.10. So I want to execute Eclipse w/o opening a terminal and running it.

It must be something very simple.

You can use Main Menu for this. If not, install it first:

sudo apt-get install alacarte

1. Open Main Menu

2. See the example

After that you can call your applications with name: "command_of_application".

Edit: I missed that you had asked for applications in your home directory. If so, command must be the full path of that application.

The applications launchers Gnome knows about are .desktop files in /usr/share/applications, and ~/.local/share/applications. You can create custom...

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create a file called intellij.desktop in the directory /usr/share/applications/

my file looks like this

[Desktop Entry] Name=IntelliJ IDEA Community Edition Comment=Free Java, Groovy, Scala and Android applications development Exec=/path/to/your/bin/idea.sh Path=/path/to/your/bin Terminal=false Icon=intellij-idea-ce Type=Application Categories=Development;IDE

for more details check this website, http://standards.freedesktop.org/desktop-entry-spec/desktop-entry-spec-latest.html

edit: mlissner (Thank you!) mentioned that intelliJ in particular implemented a feature to add that Icon/Launcher automatically. Just open IntelliJ IDE, go to Tools and click Create Desktop...

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I'm trying to add a launcher for Eclipse (downloaded as part of the ADT bundle from Google, installed to home folder) to the dock in Gnome-Shell 3.10.4. Additionally, I'd like to see eclipse listed when I open up the overview and start typing its name. I can't for the life of me get the desired results, even after adding/removing key/value pairs, logging out/in, and restarting.

*Edit: I should probably mention that I'm trying to list eclipse in the applications menu (Show Applications from overview) before adding to favorites, which will complete objective #1.

Here is the contents of $HOME/.local/share/applications/eclipse_ADT.desktop

[Desktop Entry]
Name=Eclipse
Comment=Eclipse IDE with Android SDK
Icon=$HOME/android_dev/eclipse/icon.xpm
Exec=$HOME/android_dev/eclipse/eclipse
Type=Application
Terminal=false

I've done quite a bit of searching and have gleaned information from the following sources (to no avail):

1.)...

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Create Gnome 3 Launcher

The Guide Shows You How-to Manually Create a Custom Application Launcher on Linux Gnome 3 Desktop.

At the Moment the Default Alacarte GUI Menu Editor Tool still Manifest some Issues…

And this Visual Guide includes the Basic Screenshots of All GUI Steps involved.

The Contents and Details of Post are Expressly Minimal to Give Focus Only to the Essentials Tips, Instructions and Commands so to Make the Tut Easier to Read & Digest ;)

Open a Terminal Window
(Press “Enter” to Execute Commands)

Linux How-to Easy Locate/Search/Find Files/Directories/Paths on Command Line:

Linux Locate Command Utility

Login as SuperUser

su

If Got “User is Not in Sudoers file” then Look: Solution
Or

sudo su

If Got “User is Not in Sudoers file” then Look: Solution

Create Launcher Manually with Editor nano /usr/share/applications/nightly.desktop

Example:

[Desktop Entry] Name=Nightly Comment=Firefox...
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May 25, 2011

I am running Fedora 15 and Gnome 3, most of which I like and is working. However I can't seem to add a custom launcher or if I install a application and the .desktop file is created and placed in ~/.local/share/applications the application is not appearing in the search for that application. How do I add a custom application to the list of applications installed?

Fedora :: F11 Custom Panel Launchers Lost After Upgrade? Ubuntu :: Custom Launchers On Nautilus Toolbar? OpenSUSE :: Clean Up Alacarte - Move Around Launchers In Application Browser Ubuntu :: New Launchers In Unity - Nautilus Icon - Group The Launchers? Fedora :: Create Custom Application Launcher In Gnome 3 Ubuntu :: 64x Natty Install Using Gnome3 Ppa ( Official Ppa From Gnome3)? Ubuntu :: Custom Launcher Application - Will Only Execute Once? General :: Assigning Custom Command For An Application? Debian Multimedia :: No Gnome 3.14 Custom Application Launcher? Ubuntu :: Unable To Set Custom...
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Have you ever wanted a simple means of starting up a new application or program that you have just compiled, installed, or by some means localized onto your *nix system running Gnome3 for a window manager only to discover that there is no predefined way of adding an icon/link to the menu?

Well gentle reader, you are in luck, as there really isn't a whole lot to the coding of custom menu items up for yourself.

First off, a little background information is necessary. Gnome3 uses what are called 'Desktop Entry' files to store information about particular items that are executable from the desktop or its menu system. These file end in '.desktop' and are typically stored in /usr/share/applications.

Figure 1:

/usr/share/applications ## Where the executable links are stored /usr/share/pixmaps ## Where the icons can be found

Also, the /usr/share/pixmaps directory is a really good start on locating the icons for use in the menu or within Gnome3 in...

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Brief: Some basic and some interesting GNOME customization tips to get more out of your Ubuntu 17.10 desktop.

When I last wrote about things to do after installing Ubuntu 17.10, I didn’t focus a lot on customizing GNOME. It’s because tweaking GNOME is a vast topic and it deserves an article of its own. And hence here I am with some basic and some interesting GNOME tips.

While I have written this article focusing on Ubuntu 17.10, I am sure that most of these tweaks are applicable to any Linux distribution using GNOME desktop.

Before you see how to customize GNOME, you should first get acquainted with this desktop environment.

Get Familiar with GNOME in Ubuntu 17.10

Most of the points in this section are obvious ones. I still included them so that it helps you if you are entirely new to GNOME desktop.

Activities

The Activities gives you a quick glance at various (graphical) applications running on your system. You can also...

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Summary

The VNC (Virtual Network Computing) facilities provide remote access to desktops, and allow your Linux systems to act as terminal servers, running many network-accessible desktops simultaneously. Unfortunately the flexibility of VNC makes it less approachable than other remote desktop solutions.

I needed to setup VNC a few years ago, and could not find a tutorial that thoroughly explained the permutations, so I wrote this one. It is still here, and occasionally updated, since people continue to find it useful.

Privileged Commands: Commands that require root (administrative) privileges are shown with the pound sign (#). On Ubuntu, simply replace the hash with sudo.

The X-Window graphics system used by Linux and other UNIX-like systems creates a desktop (a display) for the attached monitor (or console), and may also create additional desktops on demand. VNC uses this feature to run extra desktops on the system, and makes these...

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