Adapt Ubuntu to a high-DPI resolution screen

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There are some steps to take:

1. System wide Menu and titlebar scaling

Starting with 14.04 we have an option that helps a bit:

Scaling Support

open the System Settings (here in english:)

LANG=c unity-control-center

Go to "Displays" and set the "Scale for menu and title bars":

see also: How to find and change the screen DPI?

2. Universal Access

Go to "Universal Access" (unity-control-center universal-access) and select "Large Text".
Note: not all applications handle this correctly, some will not reserve the extra space, so some UI elements are not accessible with this option!

3.increase unity dock size

In unity-control-center->Appearance->Look at the botom, you can adjust the size

4. adapt Firefox

see: Adjust Firefox and Thunderbird to a High DPI touchscreen display (retina)

(or use Chrome, which works fine since Version 41.0.2272.76 Ubuntu 14.10, though Chrome will need to be...

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What are the steps you need to adapt Ubuntu on a fresh installed Laptop with a high resolution display?

I have a display with 3200x1600px on only 11'' which is all realy tiny.

There are some steps to take:

1. System wide Menu and titlebar scaling

Starting with 14.04 we have an option that helps a bit:

Scaling Support

open the System Settings (here in english:)

LANG=c unity-control-center

Go to "Displays" and set the "Scale for menu and title bars":

see also: How to find and change the screen DPI?

2. Universal Access

Go to "Universal Access" (unity-control-center universal-access) and select "Large Text".
Note: not all applications handle this correctly, some will not reserve the extra space, so some UI elements are not accessible with this option!

3.increase unity dock size

In unity-control-center->Appearance->Look at the botom, you can adjust the size

4. adapt...

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How can I adapt Ubuntu to a high resolution display?

I have a display with 3200x1600px on only 11'' and everything looks really tiny.

There are some steps to take:

1. System wide Menu and titlebar scaling

Starting with 14.04 we have an option that helps a bit:

Scaling Support

open the System Settings (here in english:)

LANG=c unity-control-center

Go to "Displays" and set the "Scale for menu and title bars":

see also: How to find and change the screen DPI?

2. Universal Access

Go to "Universal Access" (unity-control-center universal-access) and select "Large Text".
Note: not all applications handle this correctly, some will not reserve the extra space, so some UI elements are not accessible with this option!

3.increase unity dock size

In unity-control-center->Appearance->Look at the botom, you can adjust the size

4. adapt Firefox

see: Adjust Firefox and Thunderbird to a...

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Your preferred screen resolution is not available in the Display settings? Well, here I’m going to show you how to add a custom screen resolution in Ubuntu 17.04 (Work on all current Ubuntu releases).

On my Ubuntu 17.04 Desktop, the default 1920X1080 (16:9) resolution is kinda high for me. Though there are options to scale for menu, title bars, and text, I prefer 1600X900 (16:9) which is available in Ubuntu 16.04 LTS by default.

To get my screen resolution, I did the following steps:

1. Open terminal via Ctrl+Alt+T or by searching for “Terminal” from dash. When it opens, run command:

xrandr

It outputs current screen resolution as well as all available solutions. ALL I need here is the display device name, in my case, it’s eDP-1.

2. Run command to calculate VESA CVT mode lines by given resolution:

cvt 1600 900

Replace 1600 900 (1600X900 in my case) in the command to your desired screen resolution.

3. Copy...

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I have a Dell XPS 13. I got it with windows 8 and it adapts the fonts and icons to the 3200x1800 screen resolution. Then I start my virtual Ubuntu Studio 14.04 machine and they look really small. How does Ubuntu Studio handle that? Is there a way I can set it to do the same windows does (i.e. make them extra big so I can read them in menus and titles)?

I'm using Ubuntu Studio 14.04, with XFCE, so this answer won't work because the options are different than those for Unity.

I have adapted font sizes and icons using different configuration options, and most apps seem to work, as well as Desktop.

But some applications, like Blender, won't change. Is there like a general way to tell Ubuntu-Studio "I'm using a High DPI screen, please...

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In standard Ubuntu with Unity:

1. Click on the icon with a cog wheel and and wrench, 'System settings'. Select Appearance and at the bottom on the window, adjust 'Launcher icon size' with the slider.

2. Return to 'All Settings'. Select 'Universal Access' and select 'Large Text' (click on the switch).

3. Return to 'All Settings'. Select 'Keyboard' and select the tab 'Shortcuts' and 'Universal Access'

Here you can enable Increase text size and Decrease text size

- Increase text size (I suggest ctrl +, will be displayed as ctrl ++)
- Decrease text size (I suggest ctrl -, will be displayed as ctrl +-)

4. Test how it works and tell us if it does what you need or if you need something more advanced

-o-

Kubuntu with the KDE desktop environment is known to be possible to tweak in 'every way you can think'. Maybe you can try it and do what you need for your high resolution screen. (Try it live before deciding to install...

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Problem:

We need help with how to use WinForms' ability to auto-scale to different DPI’s to allow us to print our Forms at 600dpi, rather than at the screen DPI.

For What-You-See-Is-What-You-Get printing, we have been simply taking our nicely laid out window and printing it (turning off scrollbars and buttons and such). That works great EXCEPT for one thing: it comes out at 96dpi or 120dpi (whatever is the screen resolution)… either of which look grainy and unprofessional (our customers are complaining). And although it is as readable as what would be on the screen, you expect printed documents to be MORE readable than on-screen… you expect to be able to see additional details, to be able to read smaller text, etc.

Alternatives considered:

Given we have auto-scaling working great, such that our window looks good in 96dpi, 120dpi, 144 dpi, etc., we were hoping we could just draw our window at 600dpi and then print that.

OR, we looked at drawing the...

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I recently acquired a new Dell XPS15 laptop, thanks to a very generous gift from Dell. It has a very nice screen, and much higher DPI than I’m used to.

However, after installing Ubuntu 16.04 LTS on it, the standard font size was unreadably tiny. I tried a bunch of things to fix the issue — using TweakTool to increase my theme’s font sizes, increasing the font size and zoom in individual applications, all kinds of things — but this was only a partial fix, and lots of things still didn’t work properly:

Icon labels on the Desktop were still unreadably small. The text in the address/search bar in Chrome was unreadably tiny. Webpages themselves ended up with bizarre CSS text problems, mostly a combination of text being huge, but the containing box still being tiny, so the text wouldn’t fit, and so you’d have weird overflow issues or text getting cut off. Various apps wouldn’t remember settings, and would reset to tiny unreadable fonts.

Finally I figured it out, and it’s...

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Screen resolutions on PCs are getting sharp and reaching up to 4K resolution. Although they are very good for watching high-quality movies or your favorite NFL games, developers may find it hard to work on IDEs that don't support high DPI screens. Icons, fonts, control buttons, toggles, and other UI elements don't scale well and look so tiny, straining your eyes and impacting productivity.

These problems make high resolution displays unfriendly for development. Note that this might not be a problem in Macs because MacOS natively offers support scaling of your programs so that they look better regardless of high display resolutions. In Windows, individual programs should handle high DPIs by themselves.

The most popular IDEs, like Eclipse and JDeveloper, don't understand high DPI screens. You might want to wear powerful reading glasses while coding in these IDEs!

Eclipse and JDeveloper appear like in the below screenshots on...

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Ultra-high-resolution displays with high pixel densities are all the rage now, and for good reason: They look amazing compared to conventional displays. The big problem for PC users is that a lot of software isn't designed with that level of pixel density in mind.

If you're running GNOME 3 in Linux, your first boot will have you looking for your reading glasses. (Windows suffers from similar issues with high-DPI displays.)

Luckily, you can save your eyes and enjoy that glorious screen you paid for with a few steps. This article will show you how to change the scaling settings for GNOME 3, Mozilla’s Firefox and Thunderbird, and Chromium.

Wait, what is HiDPI exactly, and why is it a problem?

If you've ever wondered why Apple's Retina displays look so sharp, it's because they have more dots (pixels) in every inch of the screen than a typical display. This is called high pixel-per-inch (ppi) or high pixel density. Pixels per inch is often used...

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